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Science. 2018 Jun 1;360(6392):1024-1027. doi: 10.1126/science.aar6851.

Ancient human parallel lineages within North America contributed to a coastal expansion.

Author information

1
Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK. cls83@ut.ee tk331@cam.ac.uk malhi@illinois.edu.
2
Estonian Biocentre, Institute of Genomics, University of Tartu, Tartu 51010, Estonia.
3
Department of Anthropology and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
4
Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK.
5
Department of Biology, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.
6
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S2, Canada.
7
Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3DZ, UK.
8
Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, USA.
9
Department of Anthropology, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97232, USA.
10
Knight Diagnostics Laboratory, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.
11
Department of Anthropology, Modesto Junior College, Modesto, CA 95350, USA.
12
Department Hommes Natures Societies, Musée de l'Homme, Paris 75016, France.
13
Department of Anthropology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
14
Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.
15
Department of Anthropology and Museum Studies, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926, USA.
16
Department of Anthropology, San Diego City College, San Diego, CA 92101, USA.
17
APE Lab, Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
18
Department of Anthropology, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.
19
Kenai Peninsula College, Soldotna, AK 99669, USA.
20
Far Western Anthropological Research Group Inc., Davis, CA 95618, USA.
21
Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area, P.O. Box 360791, Milpitas, CA 95036, USA.
22
Department of Anthropology, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192, USA.
23
Archaeological Services Inc., Toronto, Canada.
24
Huron-Wendat Nation, Canada.
25
Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
26
Barbareño Chumash, California Indian Advisory Committee, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, USA.
27
Tongva Nation, CA, USA.
28
Department of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada.
29
Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
30
Department of Anthropology and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. cls83@ut.ee tk331@cam.ac.uk malhi@illinois.edu.

Abstract

Little is known regarding the first people to enter the Americas and their genetic legacy. Genomic analysis of the oldest human remains from the Americas showed a direct relationship between a Clovis-related ancestral population and all modern Central and South Americans as well as a deep split separating them from North Americans in Canada. We present 91 ancient human genomes from California and Southwestern Ontario and demonstrate the existence of two distinct ancestries in North America, which possibly split south of the ice sheets. A contribution from both of these ancestral populations is found in all modern Central and South Americans. The proportions of these two ancestries in ancient and modern populations are consistent with a coastal dispersal and multiple admixture events.

PMID:
29853687
DOI:
10.1126/science.aar6851
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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