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Items: 45

1.

Dietary salt regulates uroguanylin expression and signaling activity in the kidney, but not in the intestine.

Fellner RC, Moss NG, Goy MF.

Physiol Rep. 2016 May;4(9). pii: e12782. doi: 10.14814/phy2.12782. Epub 2016 May 15.

2.

The rat kidney contains high levels of prouroguanylin (the uroguanylin precursor) but does not express GC-C (the enteric uroguanylin receptor).

Qian X, Moss NG, Fellner RC, Taylor-Blake B, Goy MF.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2011 Feb;300(2):F561-73. doi: 10.1152/ajprenal.00282.2010. Epub 2010 Nov 24.

3.

Natriuretic and antikaliuretic effects of uroguanylin and prouroguanylin in the rat.

Moss NG, Riguera DA, Fellner RC, Cazzolla C, Goy MF.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2010 Dec;299(6):F1433-42. doi: 10.1152/ajprenal.00281.2010. Epub 2010 Sep 22.

4.

The natriuretic peptide uroguanylin elicits physiologic actions through 2 distinct topoisomers.

Moss NG, Riguera DA, Solinga RM, Kessler MM, Zimmer DP, Arendshorst WJ, Currie MG, Goy MF.

Hypertension. 2009 May;53(5):867-76. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.108.128264. Epub 2009 Mar 16.

5.

Circulating prouroguanylin is processed to its active natriuretic form exclusively within the renal tubules.

Qian X, Moss NG, Fellner RC, Goy MF.

Endocrinology. 2008 Sep;149(9):4499-509. doi: 10.1210/en.2007-1724. Epub 2008 May 22.

6.

Uroguanylin, an intestinal natriuretic peptide, is delivered to the kidney as an unprocessed propeptide.

Moss NG, Fellner RC, Qian X, Yu SJ, Li Z, Nakazato M, Goy MF.

Endocrinology. 2008 Sep;149(9):4486-98. doi: 10.1210/en.2007-1725. Epub 2008 May 22.

7.

Mass spectral characterization of peptide transmitters/hormones in the nervous system and neuroendocrine organs of the American lobster Homarus americanus.

Ma M, Chen R, Sousa GL, Bors EK, Kwiatkowski MA, Goiney CC, Goy MF, Christie AE, Li L.

Gen Comp Endocrinol. 2008 Apr 1;156(2):395-409. doi: 10.1016/j.ygcen.2008.01.009. Epub 2008 Jan 26.

8.

Identification of neuropeptides from the decapod crustacean sinus glands using nanoscale liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

Fu Q, Goy MF, Li L.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005 Nov 25;337(3):765-78. Epub 2005 Sep 28.

PMID:
16214114
9.

Nitric oxide: an inhibitory retrograde modulator in the crustacean heart.

Goy MF.

Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2005 Oct;142(2):151-63. Epub 2005 Jul 7. Review.

PMID:
16005651
10.

Nitric oxide inhibits the rate and strength of cardiac contractions in the lobster Homarus americanus by acting on the cardiac ganglion.

Mahadevan A, Lappé J, Rhyne RT, Cruz-Bermúdez ND, Marder E, Goy MF.

J Neurosci. 2004 Mar 17;24(11):2813-24.

11.

mRNA expression patterns of the cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases types 2, 5, and 9 during development of the rat brain.

Van Staveren WC, Steinbusch HW, Markerink-Van Ittersum M, Repaske DR, Goy MF, Kotera J, Omori K, Beavo JA, De Vente J.

J Comp Neurol. 2003 Dec 22;467(4):566-80.

PMID:
14624489
12.

Expression of nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide-sensitive guanylate cyclase in the crustacean cardiac ganglion.

Scholz NL, Labenia JS, de Vente J, Graubard K, Goy MF.

J Comp Neurol. 2002 Dec 9;454(2):158-67.

PMID:
12412140
13.

Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

Goy MF, Oliver PM, Purdy KE, Knowles JW, Fox JE, Mohler PJ, Qian X, Smithies O, Maeda N.

Biochem J. 2001 Sep 1;358(Pt 2):379-87.

14.

Expression of GC-C, a receptor-guanylate cyclase, and its endogenous ligands uroguanylin and guanylin along the rostrocaudal axis of the intestine.

Qian X, Prabhakar S, Nandi A, Visweswariah SS, Goy MF.

Endocrinology. 2000 Sep;141(9):3210-24.

PMID:
10965892
15.

Selective coupling of G protein beta gamma complexes to inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

Diversé-Pierluissi M, McIntire WE, Myung CS, Lindorfer MA, Garrison JC, Goy MF, Dunlap K.

J Biol Chem. 2000 Sep 15;275(37):28380-5.

16.

Tissue distribution, cellular source, and structural analysis of rat immunoreactive uroguanylin.

Nakazato M, Yamaguchi H, Date Y, Miyazato M, Kangawa K, Goy MF, Chino N, Matsukura S.

Endocrinology. 1998 Dec;139(12):5247-54.

PMID:
9832465
17.

Natriuretic peptide receptor 1 expression influences blood pressures of mice in a dose-dependent manner.

Oliver PM, John SW, Purdy KE, Kim R, Maeda N, Goy MF, Smithies O.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Mar 3;95(5):2547-51.

18.

Identification of nitric oxide-sensitive and -insensitive forms of cytoplasmic guanylate cyclase.

Prabhakar S, Short DB, Scholz NL, Goy MF.

J Neurochem. 1997 Oct;69(4):1650-60.

19.

Uroguanylin is expressed by enterochromaffin cells in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

Perkins A, Goy MF, Li Z.

Gastroenterology. 1997 Sep;113(3):1007-14.

PMID:
9287996
20.

Purification, cDNA sequence, and tissue distribution of rat uroguanylin.

Li Z, Perkins AG, Peters MF, Campa MJ, Goy MF.

Regul Pept. 1997 Jan 15;68(1):45-56.

PMID:
9094754
21.

Low salt intake down-regulates the guanylin signaling pathway in rat distal colon.

Li Z, Knowles JW, Goyeau D, Prabhakar S, Short DB, Perkins AG, Goy MF.

Gastroenterology. 1996 Dec;111(6):1714-21.

22.

Nitric oxide and peptide neurohormones activate cGMP synthesis in the crab stomatogastric nervous system.

Scholz NL, Goy MF, Truman JW, Graubard K.

J Neurosci. 1996 Mar 1;16(5):1614-22.

23.

Guanylin, an endogenous ligand for C-type guanylate cyclase, is produced by goblet cells in the rat intestine.

Li Z, Taylor-Blake B, Light AR, Goy MF.

Gastroenterology. 1995 Dec;109(6):1863-75.

PMID:
7498651
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29.

cGMP: the wayward child of the cyclic nucleotide family.

Goy MF.

Trends Neurosci. 1991 Jul;14(7):293-9. Review.

PMID:
1719676
30.
32.
34.

Serotonin-induced protein phosphorylation in a lobster neuromuscular preparation.

Goy MF, Schwarz TL, Kravitz EA.

J Neurosci. 1984 Mar;4(3):611-26.

35.

Amines and a peptide as neurohormones in lobsters: actions on neuromuscular preparations and preliminary behavioural studies.

Kravitz EA, Glusman S, Harris-Warrick RM, Livingstone MS, Schwarz T, Goy MF.

J Exp Biol. 1980 Dec;89:159-75.

36.

Attractants and repellents control demethylation of methylated chemotaxis proteins in Escherichia coli.

Toews ML, Goy MF, Springer MS, Adler J.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1979 Nov;76(11):5544-8.

37.

Protein methylation in behavioural control mechanisms and in signal transduction.

Springer MS, Goy MF, Adler J.

Nature. 1979 Jul 26;280(5720):279-84. Review.

PMID:
379649
38.

Pleiotropic aspartate taxis and serine taxis mutants of Escherichia coli.

Reader RW, Tso WW, Springer MS, Goy MF, Adler J.

J Gen Microbiol. 1979 Apr;111(2):363-74.

PMID:
383889
39.

On the mechanism of sensory transduction in bacterial chemotaxis.

Adler J, Goy MF, Springer MS, Szmelcman S.

Soc Gen Physiol Ser. 1979;33:123-37.

PMID:
370997
40.
41.

Attraction by repellents: an error in sensory information processing by bacterial mutants.

Muskavitch MA, Kort EN, Springer MS, Goy MF, Adler J.

Science. 1978 Jul 7;201(4350):63-5.

PMID:
351803
42.

Sensory transduction in Escherichia coli: role of a protein methylation reaction in sensory adaptation.

Goy MF, Springer MS, Adler J.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1977 Nov;74(11):4964-8.

43.
44.

Sensory transduction in Escherichia coli: a requirement for methionine in sensory adaptation.

Springer MS, Goy MF, Adler J.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1977 Jan;74(1):183-7.

45.

Methylation of a membrane protein involved in bacterial chemotaxis.

Kort EN, Goy MF, Larsen SH, Adler J.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1975 Oct;72(10):3939-43.

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