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Parasitol Res. 2017 Jun;116(6):1745-1753. doi: 10.1007/s00436-017-5453-7. Epub 2017 May 2.

Is trace element concentration correlated to parasite abundance? A case study in a population of the green frog Pelophylax synkl. hispanicus from the Neto River (Calabria, southern Italy).

Author information

1
DiBEST, Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 4B, Rende (CS), Italy.
2
DiBEST, Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 4B, Rende (CS), Italy. emilio.sperone@unical.it.

Abstract

Bioaccumulation of 13 trace elements in the livers of 38 Pelophylax sinkl. hispanicus (Ranidae) and its helminth communities were studied and compared among three sites, each with a different degree of pollution along River Neto (south Italy) during September, 2014. Trace element concentrations in water and liver were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For most elements, the highest concentration was recorded in the frogs inhabiting the third site, the one with the highest degree of pollution. The trend of trace element concentration in the liver can be represented as follows: Cu > Zn > Mn > Se > Cr. Concentrations of some elements in water and liver samples were significantly different among the three sites and this is evidenced by the bioaccumulation in the frogs. Four species of helminths, all belonging to Nematoda, were found: Rhabdias sp., Oswaldocruzia filiformis (Goeze, 1782), Cosmocerca ornata (Dujarden, 1845), Seuratascaris numidica (Seurat, 1917). The parasite survey presents an important difference of prevalence and average number of helminths in frogs between the three sites. Correlating parasitological and ecotoxicological data showed a strong positive correlation between prevalence and number of parasites with some trace elements such as Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, and Cd.

KEYWORDS:

Amphibian; Anthropogenic pollution; Bioaccumulation; Ecotoxicology; Helminths

PMID:
28466247
DOI:
10.1007/s00436-017-5453-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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