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Sci Adv. 2019 Nov 27;5(11):eaay9969. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aay9969. eCollection 2019 Nov.

Integrating climate adaptation and biodiversity conservation in the global ocean.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
2
UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge, UK.
3
School of Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
4
Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
5
British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK.
6
WWF-Canada, Montreal, QC, Canada.
7
Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
8
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
9
Global Fishing Watch, Washington, DC, USA.
10
The Moore Center for Science, Conservation International, Arlington, VA, USA.
11
Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS, Canada.
12
The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, VA, USA.
13
School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, UK.
14
Department of Environment and Geography, University of York, York, UK.
15
Marine Affairs Program, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
16
Ocean Wise, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

The impacts of climate change and the socioecological challenges they present are ubiquitous and increasingly severe. Practical efforts to operationalize climate-responsive design and management in the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) are required to ensure long-term effectiveness for safeguarding marine biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here, we review progress in integrating climate change adaptation into MPA design and management and provide eight recommendations to expedite this process. Climate-smart management objectives should become the default for all protected areas, and made into an explicit international policy target. Furthermore, incentives to use more dynamic management tools would increase the climate change responsiveness of the MPA network as a whole. Given ongoing negotiations on international conservation targets, now is the ideal time to proactively reform management of the global seascape for the dynamic climate-biodiversity reality.

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