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Appl Environ Microbiol. 2019 Aug 29;85(18). pii: e00777-19. doi: 10.1128/AEM.00777-19. Print 2019 Sep 15.

Shewanella decolorationis LDS1 Chromate Resistance.

Author information

1
Institut de Microbiologie de la Méditerranée, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.
2
Institut de Microbiologie de la Méditerranée, Laboratoire de Chimie Bactérienne, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.
3
Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Department of Molecular Enzymology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
4
Institut de Microbiologie de la Méditerranée, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France iobbi@imm.cnrs.fr.

Abstract

The genus Shewanella is well known for its genetic diversity, its outstanding respiratory capacity, and its high potential for bioremediation. Here, a novel strain isolated from sediments of the Indian Ocean was characterized. A 16S rRNA analysis indicated that it belongs to the species Shewanella decolorationis It was named Shewanella decolorationis LDS1. This strain presented an unusual ability to grow efficiently at temperatures from 24°C to 40°C without apparent modifications of its metabolism, as shown by testing respiratory activities or carbon assimilation, and in a wide range of salt concentrations. Moreover, S. decolorationis LDS1 tolerates high chromate concentrations. Indeed, it was able to grow in the presence of 4 mM chromate at 28°C and 3 mM chromate at 40°C. Interestingly, whatever the temperature, when the culture reached the stationary phase, the strain reduced the chromate present in the growth medium. In addition, S. decolorationis LDS1 degrades different toxic dyes, including anthraquinone, triarylmethane, and azo dyes. Thus, compared to Shewanella oneidensis, this strain presented better capacity to cope with various abiotic stresses, particularly at high temperatures. The analysis of genome sequence preliminary data indicated that, in contrast to S. oneidensis and S. decolorationis S12, S. decolorationis LDS1 possesses the phosphorothioate modification machinery that has been described as participating in survival against various abiotic stresses by protecting DNA. We demonstrate that its heterologous production in S. oneidensis allows it to resist higher concentrations of chromate.IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have long been described as interesting microorganisms in regard to their ability to reduce many organic and inorganic compounds, including metals. However, members of the Shewanella genus are often depicted as cold-water microorganisms, although their optimal growth temperature usually ranges from 25 to 28°C under laboratory growth conditions. Shewanella decolorationis LDS1 is highly attractive, since its metabolism allows it to develop efficiently at temperatures from 24 to 40°C, conserving its ability to respire alternative substrates and to reduce toxic compounds such as chromate or toxic dyes. Our results clearly indicate that this novel strain has the potential to be a powerful tool for bioremediation and unveil one of the mechanisms involved in its chromate resistance.

KEYWORDS:

Shewanella; bioremediation; chromium; decolorization; dndBCDE ; dyes; temperature

PMID:
31300400
PMCID:
PMC6715848
[Available on 2020-02-29]
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.00777-19

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