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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 Nov 5;116(45):22851-22861. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1902932116. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Trait-like variants in human functional brain networks.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110; seitzman@wustl.edu caterina.gratton@northwestern.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
3
Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
4
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110.
5
Veterans Integrated Service Network 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX 76711.
6
Center for Vital Longevity, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75235.
7
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798.
8
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130.
9
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110.
10
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110.
11
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD 21205.
12
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110.
13
Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110.
14
Program in Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108.
15
Department of Biomedical Engineering, McKelvey School of Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130.

Abstract

Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has provided converging descriptions of group-level functional brain organization. Recent work has revealed that functional networks identified in individuals contain local features that differ from the group-level description. We define these features as network variants. Building on these studies, we ask whether distributions of network variants reflect stable, trait-like differences in brain organization. Across several datasets of highly-sampled individuals we show that 1) variants are highly stable within individuals, 2) variants are found in characteristic locations and associate with characteristic functional networks across large groups, 3) task-evoked signals in variants demonstrate a link to functional variation, and 4) individuals cluster into subgroups on the basis of variant characteristics that are related to differences in behavior. These results suggest that distributions of network variants may reflect stable, trait-like, functionally relevant individual differences in functional brain organization.

KEYWORDS:

functional connectivity; individual differences; networks; resting-state

PMID:
31611415
PMCID:
PMC6842602
[Available on 2020-04-14]
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1902932116

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