Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2009 Jul 10;325(5937):197-201. doi: 10.1126/science.1176225. Epub 2009 May 22.

Antigenic and genetic characteristics of swine-origin 2009 A(H1N1) influenza viruses circulating in humans.

Author information

1
WHO Collaborating Center for Influenza, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Abstract

Since its identification in April 2009, an A(H1N1) virus containing a unique combination of gene segments from both North American and Eurasian swine lineages has continued to circulate in humans. The lack of similarity between the 2009 A(H1N1) virus and its nearest relatives indicates that its gene segments have been circulating undetected for an extended period. Its low genetic diversity suggests that the introduction into humans was a single event or multiple events of similar viruses. Molecular markers predictive of adaptation to humans are not currently present in 2009 A(H1N1) viruses, suggesting that previously unrecognized molecular determinants could be responsible for the transmission among humans. Antigenically the viruses are homogeneous and similar to North American swine A(H1N1) viruses but distinct from seasonal human A(H1N1).

PMID:
19465683
PMCID:
PMC3250984
DOI:
10.1126/science.1176225
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center