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Science. 2015 Oct 16;350(6258):302-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aab1680.

CO2 capture from humid flue gases and humid atmosphere using a microporous coppersilicate.

Author information

1
Korea Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742, Korea.
2
Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, Korea.
3
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Graduate School of EEWS, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, Korea. School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210, China.
5
Korea Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742, Korea. yoonkb@sogang.ac.kr.

Abstract

Capturing CO2 from humid flue gases and atmosphere with porous materials remains costly because prior dehydration of the gases is required. A large number of microporous materials with physical adsorption capacity have been developed as CO2-capturing materials. However, most of them suffer from CO2 sorption capacity reduction or structure decomposition that is caused by co-adsorbed H2O when exposed to humid flue gases and atmosphere. We report a highly stable microporous coppersilicate. It has H2O-specific and CO2-specific adsorption sites but does not have H2O/CO2-sharing sites. Therefore, it readily adsorbs both H2O and CO2 from the humid flue gases and atmosphere, but the adsorbing H2O does not interfere with the adsorption of CO2. It is also highly stable after adsorption of H2O and CO2 because it was synthesized hydrothermally.

PMID:
26472904
DOI:
10.1126/science.aab1680
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