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Respir Care. 2018 Sep 25. pii: respcare.06356. doi: 10.4187/respcare.06356. [Epub ahead of print]

Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescents and Adults With Cystic Fibrosis: Physical and Mental Health Predictors.

Author information

1
School of Nursing and Midwifery in University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland.
2
Department of Clinical Health Psychology in the Leeds Teaching Hospitals, NHS Trust, Leeds, United Kingdom.
3
Johns Hopkins Adherence Research Center in the John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
School of Public Health in University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland.
5
Department of Pediatrics in Cork University Hospital, Cork, Republic of Ireland.
6
School of Nursing and Midwifery in University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland. e.savage@ucc.ie.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

People with cystic fibrosis face substantial physical, psychological, and social challenges as they move into adolescence and adulthood, which are likely to impact on their health-related quality of life. This study sought to examine the relative importance of physical and mental health variables associated with health-related quality of life in this group.

METHODS:

Adults and adolescents (N = 174; ≥14 y old) from across 11 adult or pediatric cystic fibrosis clinics in the Republic of Ireland, completed a background questionnaire that contained self-reported physical health variables, pulmonary function (ie, FEV1%) and body mass index. Questionnaire packs also contained the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised, which has been specifically designed to assess health-related quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis.

RESULTS:

HADS depression and/or anxiety scores were negatively associated with 11 of the 12 Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised domain scores. FEV1% was positively associated with 8 domains when controlling for HADS anxiety but only 4 domains when controlling for HADS depression. HADS anxiety and depression scores demonstrated larger effect sizes and explained a greater proportion of the variance than pulmonary function in 8 of the 12 Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised domain scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mental health variables, depression and anxiety, were strongly associated with health-related quality of life in subjects with cystic fibrosis and demonstrated greater effect sizes and explained a higher proportion of the variance overall than the physical health indicators, FEV1% and body mass index, which highlighted the importance of screening for, and treating, depression and anxiety symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety; cystic fibrosis; depression; health-related quality of life (HRQOL); mental health; physical health; predictors

PMID:
30254044
DOI:
10.4187/respcare.06356

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have disclosed no conflicts of interest.

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