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BMJ Open. 2018 Oct 18;8(10):e020347. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020347.

Women's psychological experiences of physiological childbirth: a meta-synthesis.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Alcala de Henares, Madrid, Spain.
2
School of Nursing & Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
3
Bob Shapell School of Social Work, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
4
Institute of Psychology, Uniwersytet Gdanski, Gdansk, Poland.
5
School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Akureyri, Iceland.
6
Department of Psychology, Universitat Konstanz Fachbereich Psychologie, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.
7
Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
8
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
9
Emory University. Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, USA.
10
School of Health Science, University of Akureyri, Akureyri, Iceland.
11
University of Central Lancashire, preston, Lancashire, UK.
12
Research Centre for Midwifery Science, Zuyd University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To synthesise qualitative studies on women's psychological experiences of physiological childbirth.

DESIGN:

Meta-synthesis.

METHODS:

Studies exploring women's psychological experiences of physiological birth using qualitative methods were eligible. The research group searched the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, SocINDEX and Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection. We contacted the key authors searched reference lists of the collected articles. Quality assessment was done independently using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. Studies were synthesised using techniques of meta-ethnography.

RESULTS:

Eight studies involving 94 women were included. Three third order interpretations were identified: 'maintaining self-confidence in early labour', 'withdrawing within as labour intensifies' and 'the uniqueness of the birth experience'. Using the first, second and third order interpretations, a line of argument developed that demonstrated 'the empowering journey of giving birth' encompassing the various emotions, thoughts and behaviours that women experience during birth.

CONCLUSION:

Giving birth physiologically is an intense and transformative psychological experience that generates a sense of empowerment. The benefits of this process can be maximised through physical, emotional and social support for women, enhancing their belief in their ability to birth and not disturbing physiology unless it is necessary. Healthcare professionals need to take cognisance of the empowering effects of the psychological experience of physiological childbirth. Further research to validate the results from this study is necessary.

PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER:

CRD42016037072.

KEYWORDS:

childbirth; empowerment; lived experiences; obstetrics; physiological childbirth; pyschological

PMID:
30341110
PMCID:
PMC6196808
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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