Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dent Educ. 2018 Mar;82(3):252-259. doi: 10.21815/JDE.018.024.

U.S. Dental Schools' Preparation for the Integrated National Board Dental Examination.

Author information

1
Dr. Duong is Assistant Professor, Center for Advanced Oral Health, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health, A.T. Still University; Ms. Cothron is a biostatistician at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; Dr. Lawson is Assistant Professor, Division of Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Ms. Doherty is Assistant Professor, Department of Comprehensive Care, School of Dental Medicine, Tufts University. mduong@atsu.edu.
2
Dr. Duong is Assistant Professor, Center for Advanced Oral Health, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health, A.T. Still University; Ms. Cothron is a biostatistician at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; Dr. Lawson is Assistant Professor, Division of Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham; and Ms. Doherty is Assistant Professor, Department of Comprehensive Care, School of Dental Medicine, Tufts University.

Abstract

An Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) combining basic, behavioral, and clinical sciences will be implemented in 2020 to replace the current two-part National Board Dental Examination required for all candidates who seek to practice dentistry in the U.S. The aims of this study were to determine how U.S. dental schools are preparing for implementation of the INBDE and to assess their top administrators' attitudes about the new exam. A total of 150 deans, academic deans, and other administrators at all 64 U.S. dental schools with graduating classes in 2016 were emailed a 19-question electronic survey. The survey questions addressed the respondents' level of support, perceived benefits and challenges, and planned preparation strategies for the INBDE. The individual response rate was 59%, representing 57 of the 64 schools. Approximately 60% of the respondents either agreed or strongly agreed that they support the integrated exam, while roughly 25% either somewhat or strongly disagreed. While most respondents (72%) reported that their institutions would be prepared for the INBDE, 74% reported that the merged exam created additional strain for their institutions. Respondents reported viewing content integration and clinical applicability as benefits of the INBDE, while required curriculum changes and student preparedness and stress were seen as challenges. Most of the respondents reported their schools were currently employing strategies to prepare for the INBDE including meetings with faculty and students and changes to curricula and course content. The beginning of the fourth year and the end of the third year were the most frequently reported times when schools planned to require students to take the INBDE, although almost half of the respondents did not yet know what it would be required at their school. Several schools were reconsidering using the boards as a passing requirement. This study found that support for the INBDE was not universal, but strategies are under way to prepare students, faculty, and curricula for this new means of assessment.

KEYWORDS:

assessment; curriculum; dental education; dental licensure; licensure; national licensure examination

PMID:
29496803
DOI:
10.21815/JDE.018.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center