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Items: 1 to 50 of 123

1.

Intracellular Invasion by Streptococcus pyogenes: Invasins, Host Receptors, and Relevance to Human Disease.

Wang B, Cleary PP.

Microbiol Spectr. 2019 Jul;7(4). doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.GPP3-0049-2018. Review.

PMID:
31267891
2.

Prospective Longitudinal Analysis of Immune Responses in Pediatric Subjects After Pharyngeal Acquisition of Group A Streptococci.

Hysmith ND, Kaplan EL, Cleary PP, Johnson DR, Penfound TA, Dale JB.

J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2017 Jun 1;6(2):187-196. doi: 10.1093/jpids/piw070.

PMID:
28204534
3.

Adhesion and invasion of Streptococcus pyogenes into host cells and clinical relevance of intracellular streptococci.

Rohde M, Cleary PP.

In: Ferretti JJ, Stevens DL, Fischetti VA, editors. Streptococcus pyogenes : Basic Biology to Clinical Manifestations [Internet]. Oklahoma City (OK): University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center; 2016-.
2016 Feb 10.

4.

Current Approaches to Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Development.

Dale JB, Batzloff MR, Cleary PP, Courtney HS, Good MF, Grandi G, Halperin S, Margarit IY, McNeil S, Pandey M, Smeesters PR, Steer AC.

In: Ferretti JJ, Stevens DL, Fischetti VA, editors. Streptococcus pyogenes : Basic Biology to Clinical Manifestations [Internet]. Oklahoma City (OK): University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center; 2016-.
2016 Feb 10.

5.

Group A Streptococcus intranasal infection promotes CNS infiltration by streptococcal-specific Th17 cells.

Dileepan T, Smith ED, Knowland D, Hsu M, Platt M, Bittner-Eddy P, Cohen B, Southern P, Latimer E, Harley E, Agalliu D, Cleary PP.

J Clin Invest. 2016 Jan;126(1):303-17. doi: 10.1172/JCI80792. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

6.

In Situ Peptide-MHC-II Tetramer Staining of Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells in Tissues.

Dileepan T, Kim HO, Cleary PP, Skinner PJ.

PLoS One. 2015 Jun 11;10(6):e0128862. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128862. eCollection 2015.

7.

Sortase A induces Th17-mediated and antibody-independent immunity to heterologous serotypes of group A streptococci.

Fan X, Wang X, Li N, Cui H, Hou B, Gao B, Cleary PP, Wang B.

PLoS One. 2014 Sep 18;9(9):e107638. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107638. eCollection 2014.

8.

Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

Kasper KJ, Zeppa JJ, Wakabayashi AT, Xu SX, Mazzuca DM, Welch I, Baroja ML, Kotb M, Cairns E, Cleary PP, Haeryfar SM, McCormick JK.

PLoS Pathog. 2014 May 29;10(5):e1004155. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004155. eCollection 2014 May.

9.

Robust antigen specific th17 T cell response to group A Streptococcus is dependent on IL-6 and intranasal route of infection.

Dileepan T, Linehan JL, Moon JJ, Pepper M, Jenkins MK, Cleary PP.

PLoS Pathog. 2011 Sep;7(9):e1002252. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002252. Epub 2011 Sep 22.

10.

Induction of TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta1-dependent predominant Th17 differentiation by group A streptococcal infection.

Wang B, Dileepan T, Briscoe S, Hyland KA, Kang J, Khoruts A, Cleary PP.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Mar 30;107(13):5937-42. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0904831107. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

11.

Different routes of bacterial infection induce long-lived TH1 memory cells and short-lived TH17 cells.

Pepper M, Linehan JL, Pagán AJ, Zell T, Dileepan T, Cleary PP, Jenkins MK.

Nat Immunol. 2010 Jan;11(1):83-9. doi: 10.1038/ni.1826. Epub 2009 Nov 22.

12.

The early interferon response of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue to Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

Hyland KA, Brennan R, Olmsted SB, Rojas E, Murphy E, Wang B, Cleary PP.

FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 2009 Apr;55(3):422-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2009.00540.x. Epub 2009 Feb 19.

13.

Intranasal bacteria induce Th1 but not Treg or Th2.

Costalonga M, Cleary PP, Fischer LA, Zhao Z.

Mucosal Immunol. 2009 Jan;2(1):85-95. doi: 10.1038/mi.2008.67. Epub 2008 Oct 8.

14.

Comprehensive analysis of antibody responses to streptococcal and tissue antigens in patients with acute rheumatic fever.

Martins TB, Hoffman JL, Augustine NH, Phansalkar AR, Fischetti VA, Zabriskie JB, Cleary PP, Musser JM, Veasy LG, Hill HR.

Int Immunol. 2008 Mar;20(3):445-52. doi: 10.1093/intimm/dxn004. Epub 2008 Feb 1.

PMID:
18245783
15.

Protein F1 and Streptococcus pyogenes resistance to phagocytosis.

Hyland KA, Wang B, Cleary PP.

Infect Immun. 2007 Jun;75(6):3188-91. Epub 2007 Mar 19.

16.

Paxillin phosphorylation: bifurcation point downstream of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in streptococcal invasion.

Wang B, Li S, Dedhar S, Cleary PP.

Cell Microbiol. 2007 Jun;9(6):1519-28. Epub 2007 Feb 9.

PMID:
17298394
17.

Streptococcus moves inward.

Cleary PP.

Nat Med. 2006 Apr;12(4):384-6. No abstract available.

PMID:
16598280
18.

Streptococcal modulation of cellular invasion via TGF-beta1 signaling.

Wang B, Li S, Southern PJ, Cleary PP.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Feb 14;103(7):2380-5. Epub 2006 Feb 7.

19.

Integrin-linked kinase is an essential link between integrins and uptake of bacterial pathogens by epithelial cells.

Wang B, Yurecko RS, Dedhar S, Cleary PP.

Cell Microbiol. 2006 Feb;8(2):257-66.

PMID:
16441436
20.

Structure of the streptococcal cell wall C5a peptidase.

Brown CK, Gu ZY, Matsuka YV, Purushothaman SS, Winter LA, Cleary PP, Olmsted SB, Ohlendorf DH, Earhart CA.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Dec 20;102(51):18391-6. Epub 2005 Dec 12.

22.

Prospects for a group A streptococcal vaccine: rationale, feasibility, and obstacles--report of a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases workshop.

Bisno AL, Rubin FA, Cleary PP, Dale JB; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Oct 15;41(8):1150-6. Epub 2005 Sep 2.

PMID:
16163634
23.

Engagement of CD46 and alpha5beta1 integrin by group A streptococci is required for efficient invasion of epithelial cells.

Rezcallah MS, Hodges K, Gill DB, Atkinson JP, Wang B, Cleary PP.

Cell Microbiol. 2005 May;7(5):645-53.

PMID:
15839894
24.

The M protein is dispensable for maturation of streptococcal cysteine protease SpeB.

Zimmerlein B, Park HS, Li S, Podbielski A, Cleary PP.

Infect Immun. 2005 Feb;73(2):859-64.

25.
26.

Primary induction of CD4 T cell responses in nasal associated lymphoid tissue during group A streptococcal infection.

Park HS, Costalonga M, Reinhardt RL, Dombek PE, Jenkins MK, Cleary PP.

Eur J Immunol. 2004 Oct;34(10):2843-53.

27.
28.

Nasal associated lymphoid tissue & M cells, a window to persistent streptococcal infections.

Cleary PP, Zhang Y, Park HS.

Indian J Med Res. 2004 May;119 Suppl:57-60.

PMID:
15232163
29.

Promotion of fibronectin independent invasion by C5a peptidase into epithelial cells in group A Streptococcus.

Purushothaman SS, Park HS, Cleary PP.

Indian J Med Res. 2004 May;119 Suppl:44-7.

PMID:
15232161
31.

M1 protein triggers a phosphoinositide cascade for group A Streptococcus invasion of epithelial cells.

Purushothaman SS, Wang B, Cleary PP.

Infect Immun. 2003 Oct;71(10):5823-30.

33.

Immune response to group A streptococcal C5a peptidase in children: implications for vaccine development.

Shet A, Kaplan EL, Johnson DR, Cleary PP.

J Infect Dis. 2003 Sep 15;188(6):809-17. Epub 2003 Sep 4.

PMID:
12964111
34.
35.

Immunization with C5a peptidase or peptidase-type III polysaccharide conjugate vaccines enhances clearance of group B Streptococci from lungs of infected mice.

Cheng Q, Debol S, Lam H, Eby R, Edwards L, Matsuka Y, Olmsted SB, Cleary PP.

Infect Immun. 2002 Nov;70(11):6409-15.

36.

Processing, stability, and kinetic parameters of C5a peptidase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

Anderson ET, Wetherell MG, Winter LA, Olmsted SB, Cleary PP, Matsuka YV.

Eur J Biochem. 2002 Oct;269(19):4839-51.

37.

The bacterial peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe inhibits killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis by human neutrophils in fibrin gels.

Li Y, Loike JD, Ember JA, Cleary PP, Lu E, Budhu S, Cao L, Silverstein SC.

J Immunol. 2002 Jan 15;168(2):816-24.

38.
39.
40.

High frequency invasion of mammalian cells by beta hemolytic streptococci.

Cleary PP, Cue D.

Subcell Biochem. 2000;33:137-66. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
10804855
41.

A nonpeptide integrin antagonist can inhibit epithelial cell ingestion of Streptococcus pyogenes by blocking formation of integrin alpha 5beta 1-fibronectin-M1 protein complexes.

Cue D, Southern SO, Southern PJ, Prabhakar J, Lorelli W, Smallheer JM, Mousa SA, Cleary PP.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Mar 14;97(6):2858-63.

42.

High-frequency intracellular invasion of epithelial cells by serotype M1 group A streptococci: M1 protein-mediated invasion and cytoskeletal rearrangements.

Dombek PE, Cue D, Sedgewick J, Lam H, Ruschkowski S, Finlay BB, Cleary PP.

Mol Microbiol. 1999 Feb;31(3):859-70.

44.

Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M1 encodes multiple pathways for entry into human epithelial cells.

Cue D, Dombek PE, Lam H, Cleary PP.

Infect Immun. 1998 Oct;66(10):4593-601.

45.

Why have group A streptococci remained susceptible to penicillin? Report on a symposium.

Horn DL, Zabriskie JB, Austrian R, Cleary PP, Ferretti JJ, Fischetti VA, Gotschlich E, Kaplan EL, McCarty M, Opal SM, Roberts RB, Tomasz A, Wachtfogel Y.

Clin Infect Dis. 1998 Jun;26(6):1341-5.

PMID:
9636860
46.

High-frequency intracellular infection and erythrogenic toxin A expression undergo phase variation in M1 group A streptococci.

Cleary PP, McLandsborough L, Ikeda L, Cue D, Krawczak J, Lam H.

Mol Microbiol. 1998 Apr;28(1):157-67.

49.
50.

Group A and group B streptococcal vaccine development. A round table presentation.

Dale JB, Cleary PP, Fischetti VA, Kasper DL, Musser JM, Zabriskie JB.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1997;418:863-8.

PMID:
9331789

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