Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2020 Feb 12. pii: JAAPL.003886-20. doi: 10.29158/JAAPL.003886-20. [Epub ahead of print]

Neurocognitive Function and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in Offenders with Mental Disorders.

Author information

1
Dr. Mela is Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Dr. Flannigan is a Research Associate, Canada Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Research Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Ms. Anderson is Research Coordinator, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Dr. Nelson is in private practice, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Mr. Krishnan is with Addiction and Mental Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Dr. Chizea is with Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Postgraduate Education, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Takahashi is a Clinician, Aboriginal Child and Youth Mental Health, Ministry of Children and Family Development, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Dr. Sanjanwala is a Research Associate, Cardiac Science Program, H. Asper Institute, Saint Boniface Hospital, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. This work was supported by an AIER Grant from the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, by a grant from the Center for Forensic Behavioural Science and Justice Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, and by the Department of Psychiatry Intramural Award at the University of Saskatchewan. mansfieldmela@gmail.com.
2
Dr. Mela is Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Dr. Flannigan is a Research Associate, Canada Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Research Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Ms. Anderson is Research Coordinator, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Dr. Nelson is in private practice, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Mr. Krishnan is with Addiction and Mental Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Dr. Chizea is with Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Postgraduate Education, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Takahashi is a Clinician, Aboriginal Child and Youth Mental Health, Ministry of Children and Family Development, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Dr. Sanjanwala is a Research Associate, Cardiac Science Program, H. Asper Institute, Saint Boniface Hospital, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. This work was supported by an AIER Grant from the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, by a grant from the Center for Forensic Behavioural Science and Justice Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, and by the Department of Psychiatry Intramural Award at the University of Saskatchewan.

Abstract

Individuals with a history of offending behavior show high rates of mental disorder as well as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Neurocognitive impairments are common in both mental disorders and FASD and may interface with offending behavior. Understanding these impairments could effectively inform clinical considerations among this population. The purpose of this study was to characterize the life experiences and examine the neurocognitive profile of a group of adult forensic psychiatric outpatients. We also investigated potential differences between offenders with FASD and the rest of the sample. Data were collected on 45 subjects on numerous variables, including demographics, background information, offending histories, and comorbidities. Subjects also completed extensive neurocognitive testing. The sample was primarily male (82.2%) with a mean age of 42 years. There was a high prevalence of lifetime adversity and varied offense histories. Subjects showed the most significant neurocognitive impairment in executive function, visual memory (immediate and delayed recall), and full-scale IQ. The FASD group (n = 12) did not differ significantly from the No-FASD group (n = 33) on any background variables. The FASD group showed significantly lower neurocognitive scores in the areas of verbal IQ, full-scale IQ, working memory, processing speed, and expressive vocabulary.

PMID:
32051201
DOI:
10.29158/JAAPL.003886-20

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center