Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Open Biol. 2018 Oct 31;8(10). pii: 180139. doi: 10.1098/rsob.180139.

Whole-head recording of chemosensory activity in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

Author information

1
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstraße 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany thomas.chartier.08@m4x.org.
2
Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstraße 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
3
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstraße 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK.
5
Developmental Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstraße 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany arendt@embl.de.

Abstract

Chemical detection is key to various behaviours in both marine and terrestrial animals. Marine species, though highly diverse, have been underrepresented so far in studies on chemosensory systems, and our knowledge mostly concerns the detection of airborne cues. A broader comparative approach is therefore desirable. Marine annelid worms with their rich behavioural repertoire represent attractive models for chemosensation. Here, we study the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii to provide the first comprehensive investigation of head chemosensory organ physiology in an annelid. By combining microfluidics and calcium imaging, we record neuronal activity in the entire head of early juveniles upon chemical stimulation. We find that Platynereis uses four types of organs to detect stimuli such as alcohols, esters, amino acids and sugars. Antennae are the main chemosensory organs, compared to the more differentially responding nuchal organs or palps. We report chemically evoked activity in possible downstream brain regions including the mushroom bodies (MBs), which are anatomically and molecularly similar to insect MBs. We conclude that chemosensation is a major sensory modality for marine annelids and propose early Platynereis juveniles as a model to study annelid chemosensory systems.

KEYWORDS:

Platynereis; calcium imaging; invertebrates; marine chemosensation; microfluidics; neuronal activity

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center