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G3 (Bethesda). 2017 Mar 10;7(3):775-780. doi: 10.1534/g3.116.037622.

Genomic Regions Associated with Tolerance to Freezing Stress and Snow Mold in Winter Wheat.

Author information

1
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164.
2
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 scott.carle@wsu.edu.
3
United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164.
4
Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164.

Abstract

Plants grown through the winter are subject to selective pressures that vary with each year's unique conditions, necessitating tolerance of numerous abiotic and biotic stress factors. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) associated with tolerance of two of these stresses, freezing temperatures and snow mold-a fungal disease complex active under snow cover. A population of 155 F2:5 recombinant inbred lines from a cross between soft white wheat cultivars "Finch" and "Eltan" was evaluated for snow mold tolerance in the field, and for freezing tolerance under controlled conditions. A total of 663 molecular markers was used to construct a genetic linkage map and identify marker-trait associations. One quantitative trait locus (QTL) associated with both freezing and snow mold tolerance was identified on chromosome 5A. A second, distinct, QTL associated with freezing tolerance also was found on 5A, and a third on 4B. A second QTL associated with snow mold tolerance was identified on chromosome 6B. The QTL on 5A associated with both traits was closely linked with the Fr-A2 (Frost-Resistance A2) locus; its significant association with both traits may have resulted from pleiotropic effects, or from greater low temperature tolerance enabling the plants to better defend against snow mold pathogens. The QTL on 4B associated with freezing tolerance, and the QTL on 6B associated with snow mold tolerance have not been reported previously, and may be useful in the identification of sources of tolerance for these traits.

KEYWORDS:

QTL mapping; Triticum aestivum; freezing tolerance; snow mold tolerance

PMID:
28143950
PMCID:
PMC5345707
DOI:
10.1534/g3.116.037622
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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