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Items: 1 to 50 of 158

1.

Memory Takes Time.

Kukushkin NV, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2017 Jul 19;95(2):259-279. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.05.029. Review.

PMID:
28728021
2.

The Contribution of Spatial and Temporal Molecular Networks in the Induction of Long-term Memory and Its Underlying Synaptic Plasticity.

Mirisis AA, Alexandrescu A, Carew TJ, Kopec AM.

AIMS Neurosci. 2016;3(3):356-384. Epub 2016 Oct 22.

3.

Transforming growth factor β recruits persistent MAPK signaling to regulate long-term memory consolidation in Aplysia californica.

Shobe J, Philips GT, Carew TJ.

Learn Mem. 2016 Apr 15;23(5):182-8. doi: 10.1101/lm.040915.115. Print 2016 May.

4.

Synaptic generation of an intracellular retrograde signal requires activation of the tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades in Aplysia.

Stough S, Kopec AM, Carew TJ.

Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2015 Nov;125:47-54. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.07.017. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

5.

Distinct Growth Factor Families Are Recruited in Unique Spatiotemporal Domains during Long-Term Memory Formation in Aplysia californica.

Kopec AM, Philips GT, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2015 Jun 3;86(5):1228-39. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.04.025.

6.

A novel cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor in Aplysia facilitates growth, MAPK activation, and long-term synaptic facilitation.

Pu L, Kopec AM, Boyle HD, Carew TJ.

Learn Mem. 2014 Apr 1;21(4):215-22. doi: 10.1101/lm.033662.113.

7.
8.

Growth factor signaling and memory formation: temporal and spatial integration of a molecular network.

Kopec AM, Carew TJ.

Learn Mem. 2013 Sep 16;20(10):531-9. doi: 10.1101/lm.031377.113. Review.

9.

Pattern and predictability in memory formation: from molecular mechanisms to clinical relevance.

Philips GT, Kopec AM, Carew TJ.

Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2013 Oct;105:117-24. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2013.05.003. Epub 2013 May 28. Review.

10.

MAPK establishes a molecular context that defines effective training patterns for long-term memory formation.

Philips GT, Ye X, Kopec AM, Carew TJ.

J Neurosci. 2013 Apr 24;33(17):7565-73. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5561-12.2013.

11.

Local synaptic integration of mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase A signaling mediates intermediate-term synaptic facilitation in Aplysia.

Ye X, Marina A, Carew TJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Oct 30;109(44):18162-7. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1209956109. Epub 2012 Oct 15.

12.

Transsynaptic coordination of presynaptic and postsynaptic modifications underlying enduring synaptic plasticity.

Ye X, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2011 May 12;70(3):379-81. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2011.04.016.

13.

The tail-elicited tail withdrawal reflex of Aplysia is mediated centrally at tail sensory-motor synapses and exhibits sensitization across multiple temporal domains.

Philips GT, Sherff CM, Menges SA, Carew TJ.

Learn Mem. 2011 Mar 30;18(4):272-82. doi: 10.1101/lm.2125311. Print 2011.

14.

Small G protein signaling in neuronal plasticity and memory formation: the specific role of ras family proteins.

Ye X, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2010 Nov 4;68(3):340-61. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2010.09.013. Review.

15.

Neuroscience and education: an ideal partnership for producing evidence-based solutions to Guide 21(st) Century Learning.

Carew TJ, Magsamen SH.

Neuron. 2010 Sep 9;67(5):685-8. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2010.08.028.

16.

A novel postsynaptic mechanism for heterosynaptic sharing of short-term plasticity.

Reissner KJ, Pu L, Schaffhausen JH, Boyle HD, Smith IF, Parker I, Carew TJ.

J Neurosci. 2010 Jun 30;30(26):8797-806. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4767-09.2010.

17.

It's all about timing.

Philips GT, Carew TJ.

Cell. 2009 Oct 2;139(1):23-5. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2009.09.020.

18.

MicroRNAs in memory processing.

Fischbach SJ, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2009 Sep 24;63(6):714-6. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2009.09.007.

19.

Temporal phases of activity-dependent plasticity and memory are mediated by compartmentalized routing of MAPK signaling in aplysia sensory neurons.

Shobe JL, Zhao Y, Stough S, Ye X, Hsuan V, Martin KC, Carew TJ.

Neuron. 2009 Jan 15;61(1):113-25. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2008.10.049.

20.

Small G proteins exhibit pattern sensitivity in MAPK activation during the induction of memory and synaptic facilitation in Aplysia.

Ye X, Shobe JL, Sharma SK, Marina A, Carew TJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Dec 23;105(51):20511-6. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0808110105. Epub 2008 Dec 15.

21.

Aplysia synapse associated protein (APSAP): identification, characterization, and selective interactions with Shaker-type potassium channels.

Reissner KJ, Boyle HD, Ye X, Carew TJ.

J Neurochem. 2008 May;105(3):1006-18. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2007.05202.x. Epub 2007 Dec 21.

23.
24.

Intermediate-term processes in memory formation.

Stough S, Shobe JL, Carew TJ.

Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2006 Dec;16(6):672-8. Epub 2006 Nov 13. Review.

PMID:
17097872
25.

A tropomyosin-related kinase B ligand is required for ERK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation, and long-term memory in aplysia.

Sharma SK, Sherff CM, Stough S, Hsuan V, Carew TJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Sep 19;103(38):14206-10. Epub 2006 Sep 8.

26.

Molecular nodes in memory processing: insights from Aplysia.

Reissner KJ, Shobe JL, Carew TJ.

Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006 May;63(9):963-74. Review.

PMID:
16596335
27.

Latent memory for sensitization in Aplysia.

Philips GT, Tzvetkova EI, Marinesco S, Carew TJ.

Learn Mem. 2006 Mar-Apr;13(2):224-9.

28.
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30.

Serotonergic modulation in aplysia. II. Cellular and behavioral consequences of increased serotonergic tone.

Marinesco S, Wickremasinghe N, Kolkman KE, Carew TJ.

J Neurophysiol. 2004 Oct;92(4):2487-96. Epub 2004 May 12.

31.

Serotonergic modulation in aplysia. I. Distributed serotonergic network persistently activated by sensitizing stimuli.

Marinesco S, Kolkman KE, Carew TJ.

J Neurophysiol. 2004 Oct;92(4):2468-86. Epub 2004 May 12.

32.

Parallel somatic and synaptic processing in the induction of intermediate-term and long-term synaptic facilitation in Aplysia.

Sherff CM, Carew TJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 May 11;101(19):7463-8. Epub 2004 Apr 29.

33.

Intermediate-term memory for site-specific sensitization in aplysia is maintained by persistent activation of protein kinase C.

Sutton MA, Bagnall MW, Sharma SK, Shobe J, Carew TJ.

J Neurosci. 2004 Apr 7;24(14):3600-9.

34.

Tyrosine kinases, synaptic plasticity and memory: insights from vertebrates and invertebrates.

Purcell AL, Carew TJ.

Trends Neurosci. 2003 Nov;26(11):625-30. Review.

PMID:
14585603
35.

Multiple serotonergic mechanisms contributing to sensitization in aplysia: evidence of diverse serotonin receptor subtypes.

Barbas D, DesGroseillers L, Castellucci VF, Carew TJ, Marinesco S.

Learn Mem. 2003 Sep-Oct;10(5):373-86. Review.

36.
37.
38.

Differential role of mitogen-activated protein kinase in three distinct phases of memory for sensitization in Aplysia.

Sharma SK, Sherff CM, Shobe J, Bagnall MW, Sutton MA, Carew TJ.

J Neurosci. 2003 May 1;23(9):3899-907.

40.

Inhibition of calcineurin facilitates the induction of memory for sensitization in Aplysia: requirement of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

Sharma SK, Bagnall MW, Sutton MA, Carew TJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Apr 15;100(8):4861-6. Epub 2003 Apr 2.

41.
42.
43.

Behavioral, Cellular, and Molecular Analysis of Memory in Aplysia II: Long-Term Facilitation.

Sherff CM, Carew TJ.

Integr Comp Biol. 2002 Aug;42(4):736-42. doi: 10.1093/icb/42.4.736.

PMID:
21708770
44.

Behavioral, cellular, and molecular analysis of memory in aplysia I: intermediate-term memory.

Sutton MA, Carew TJ.

Integr Comp Biol. 2002 Aug;42(4):725-35. doi: 10.1093/icb/42.4.725.

45.

Inclusion of phosphatase inhibitors during Western blotting enhances signal detection with phospho-specific antibodies.

Sharma SK, Carew TJ.

Anal Biochem. 2002 Aug 1;307(1):187-9. No abstract available.

PMID:
12137799
46.
47.

Neurobiology: understanding the consequences.

Carew TJ.

Nature. 2002 Jun 20;417(6891):803-6. No abstract available.

PMID:
12075334
48.

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