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Int J Parasitol. 2016 Jul;46(8):473-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2016.02.005. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Exogenous RNA interference exposes contrasting roles for sugar exudation in host-finding by plant pathogens.

Author information

1
School of Biological Sciences, Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, UK.
2
Plant Health and Environmental Protection Branch, Sustainable Agri-Food Sciences Division (SAFSD), Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast, UK.
3
School of Biological Sciences, Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, UK. Electronic address: j.dalzell@qub.ac.uk.

Abstract

Plant parasitic nematodes (PPN) locate host plants by following concentration gradients of root exudate chemicals in the soil. We present a simple method for RNA interference (RNAi)-induced knockdown of genes in tomato seedling roots, facilitating the study of root exudate composition, and PPN responses. Knockdown of sugar transporter genes, STP1 and STP2, in tomato seedlings triggered corresponding reductions of glucose and fructose, but not xylose, in collected root exudate. This corresponded directly with reduced infectivity and stylet thrusting of the promiscuous PPN Meloidogyne incognita, however we observed no impact on the infectivity or stylet thrusting of the selective Solanaceae PPN Globodera pallida. This approach can underpin future efforts to understand the early stages of plant-pathogen interactions in tomato and potentially other crop plants.

KEYWORDS:

Globodera pallida; Meloidogyne incognita; Root exudate; Sugar; exoRNAi

PMID:
27033013
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpara.2016.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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