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Items: 42

1.

Correction: RDH10-mediated retinol metabolism and RARα-mediated retinoic acid signaling are required for submandibular salivary gland initiation (doi: 10.1242/dev.164822).

Metzler MA, Raja S, Elliott KH, Friedl RM, Tran NQH, Brugmann SA, Larsen M, Sandell LL.

Development. 2018 Aug 30;145(17). pii: dev170795. doi: 10.1242/dev.170795. No abstract available.

2.

RDH10-mediated retinol metabolism and RARα-mediated retinoic acid signaling are required for submandibular salivary gland initiation.

Metzler MA, Raja S, Elliott KH, Friedl RM, Tran NQH, Brugmann SA, Larsen M, Sandell LL.

Development. 2018 Aug 2;145(15). pii: dev164822. doi: 10.1242/dev.164822. Erratum in: Development. 2018 Aug 30;145(17):.

PMID:
29986869
3.

Sending mixed signals: Cilia-dependent signaling during development and disease.

Elliott KH, Brugmann SA.

Dev Biol. 2018 Mar 13. pii: S0012-1606(17)30380-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2018.03.007. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
29548942
4.

A novel role for cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling during submandibular gland development.

Elliott KH, Millington G, Brugmann SA.

Dev Dyn. 2018 Jun;247(6):818-831. doi: 10.1002/dvdy.24627. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

PMID:
29532549
5.

Neural crest cells utilize primary cilia to regulate ventral forebrain morphogenesis via Hedgehog-dependent regulation of oriented cell division.

Schock EN, Brugmann SA.

Dev Biol. 2017 Nov 15;431(2):168-178. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.09.026. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

6.

A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development.

Schock EN, Struve JN, Chang CF, Williams TJ, Snedeker J, Attia AC, Stottmann RW, Brugmann SA.

PLoS One. 2017 Mar 27;12(3):e0174206. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174206. eCollection 2017.

7.

Unique spatiotemporal requirements for intraflagellar transport genes during forebrain development.

Snedeker J, Schock EN, Struve JN, Chang CF, Cionni M, Tran PV, Brugmann SA, Stottmann RW.

PLoS One. 2017 Mar 14;12(3):e0173258. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0173258. eCollection 2017.

8.

Cilia-dependent GLI processing in neural crest cells is required for tongue development.

Millington G, Elliott KH, Chang YT, Chang CF, Dlugosz A, Brugmann SA.

Dev Biol. 2017 Apr 15;424(2):124-137. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.02.021. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

9.

Discovery, Diagnosis, and Etiology of Craniofacial Ciliopathies.

Schock EN, Brugmann SA.

Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2017 Sep 1;9(9). pii: a028258. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a028258. Review.

PMID:
28213462
10.

Engineered human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived intestinal tissues with a functional enteric nervous system.

Workman MJ, Mahe MM, Trisno S, Poling HM, Watson CL, Sundaram N, Chang CF, Schiesser J, Aubert P, Stanley EG, Elefanty AG, Miyaoka Y, Mandegar MA, Conklin BR, Neunlist M, Brugmann SA, Helmrath MA, Wells JM.

Nat Med. 2017 Jan;23(1):49-59. doi: 10.1038/nm.4233. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

11.

Craniofacial Ciliopathies Reveal Specific Requirements for GLI Proteins during Development of the Facial Midline.

Chang CF, Chang YT, Millington G, Brugmann SA.

PLoS Genet. 2016 Nov 1;12(11):e1006351. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006351. eCollection 2016 Nov.

12.

Understanding Mechanisms of GLI-Mediated Transcription during Craniofacial Development and Disease Using the Ciliopathic Mutant, talpid2.

Chang YT, Chaturvedi P, Schock EN, Brugmann SA.

Front Physiol. 2016 Oct 17;7:468. eCollection 2016.

13.

Defects in the Fanconi Anemia Pathway in Head and Neck Cancer Cells Stimulate Tumor Cell Invasion through DNA-PK and Rac1 Signaling.

Romick-Rosendale LE, Hoskins EE, Privette Vinnedge LM, Foglesong GD, Brusadelli MG, Potter SS, Komurov K, Brugmann SA, Lambert PF, Kimple RJ, Virts EL, Hanenberg H, Gillison ML, Wells SI.

Clin Cancer Res. 2016 Apr 15;22(8):2062-73. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-15-2209. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

14.

Utilizing the chicken as an animal model for human craniofacial ciliopathies.

Schock EN, Chang CF, Youngworth IA, Davey MG, Delany ME, Brugmann SA.

Dev Biol. 2016 Jul 15;415(2):326-337. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2015.10.024. Epub 2015 Oct 24. Review.

15.

Using the avian mutant talpid2 as a disease model for understanding the oral-facial phenotypes of oral-facial-digital syndrome.

Schock EN, Chang CF, Struve JN, Chang YT, Chang J, Delany ME, Brugmann SA.

Dis Model Mech. 2015 Aug 1;8(8):855-66. doi: 10.1242/dmm.020222. Epub 2015 Jun 4.

16.

A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia.

Saal HM, Prows CA, Guerreiro I, Donlin M, Knudson L, Sund KL, Chang CF, Brugmann SA, Stottmann RW.

Hum Mol Genet. 2015 Jun 15;24(12):3399-409. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddv088. Epub 2015 Mar 10.

17.

The ciliary baton: orchestrating neural crest cell development.

Chang CF, Schock EN, Attia AC, Stottmann RW, Brugmann SA.

Curr Top Dev Biol. 2015;111:97-134. doi: 10.1016/bs.ctdb.2014.11.004. Epub 2015 Jan 22. Review.

PMID:
25662259
18.

The cellular and molecular etiology of the craniofacial defects in the avian ciliopathic mutant talpid2.

Chang CF, Schock EN, O'Hare EA, Dodgson J, Cheng HH, Muir WM, Edelmann RE, Delany ME, Brugmann SA.

Development. 2014 Aug;141(15):3003-12. doi: 10.1242/dev.105924.

19.

Building additional complexity to in vitro-derived intestinal tissues.

Brugmann SA, Wells JM.

Stem Cell Res Ther. 2013;4 Suppl 1:S1. doi: 10.1186/scrt362. Epub 2013 Dec 20. Review.

20.

Odd-skipped related-1 controls neural crest chondrogenesis during tongue development.

Liu H, Lan Y, Xu J, Chang CF, Brugmann SA, Jiang R.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Nov 12;110(46):18555-60. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1306495110. Epub 2013 Oct 28.

21.

Epigenomic annotation of enhancers predicts transcriptional regulators of human neural crest.

Rada-Iglesias A, Bajpai R, Prescott S, Brugmann SA, Swigut T, Wysocka J.

Cell Stem Cell. 2012 Nov 2;11(5):633-48. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2012.07.006. Epub 2012 Sep 13.

22.

A cross-species analysis of microRNAs in the developing avian face.

Powder KE, Ku YC, Brugmann SA, Veile RA, Renaud NA, Helms JA, Lovett M.

PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e35111. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035111. Epub 2012 Apr 16.

23.

Indian hedgehog positively regulates calvarial ossification and modulates bone morphogenetic protein signaling.

Lenton K, James AW, Manu A, Brugmann SA, Birker D, Nelson ER, Leucht P, Helms JA, Longaker MT.

Genesis. 2011 Oct;49(10):784-96. doi: 10.1002/dvg.20768. Epub 2011 Aug 24.

PMID:
21557453
24.

Role of Indian hedgehog signaling in palatal osteogenesis.

Levi B, James AW, Nelson ER, Brugmann SA, Sorkin M, Manu A, Longaker MT.

Plast Reconstr Surg. 2011 Mar;127(3):1182-90. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3182043a07.

25.

The emerging face of primary cilia.

Zaghloul NA, Brugmann SA.

Genesis. 2011 Apr;49(4):231-46. doi: 10.1002/dvg.20728. Epub 2011 Apr 1. Review.

26.

A unique chromatin signature uncovers early developmental enhancers in humans.

Rada-Iglesias A, Bajpai R, Swigut T, Brugmann SA, Flynn RA, Wysocka J.

Nature. 2011 Feb 10;470(7333):279-83. doi: 10.1038/nature09692. Epub 2010 Dec 15.

27.

Craniofacial ciliopathies: A new classification for craniofacial disorders.

Brugmann SA, Cordero DR, Helms JA.

Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Dec;152A(12):2995-3006. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33727. Review.

28.

A primary cilia-dependent etiology for midline facial disorders.

Brugmann SA, Allen NC, James AW, Mekonnen Z, Madan E, Helms JA.

Hum Mol Genet. 2010 Apr 15;19(8):1577-92. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddq030. Epub 2010 Jan 27.

29.

Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

Brugmann SA, Powder KE, Young NM, Goodnough LH, Hahn SM, James AW, Helms JA, Lovett M.

Hum Mol Genet. 2010 Mar 1;19(5):920-30. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddp559. Epub 2009 Dec 16.

30.

Estrogen/estrogen receptor alpha signaling in mouse posterofrontal cranial suture fusion.

James AW, Theologis AA, Brugmann SA, Xu Y, Carre AL, Leucht P, Hamilton K, Korach KS, Longaker MT.

PLoS One. 2009 Sep 22;4(9):e7120. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007120.

31.

Wnt and FGF signals interact to coordinate growth with cell fate specification during limb development.

ten Berge D, Brugmann SA, Helms JA, Nusse R.

Development. 2008 Oct;135(19):3247-57. doi: 10.1242/dev.023176.

32.

Primary cilia: cellular sensors for the skeleton.

Anderson CT, Castillo AB, Brugmann SA, Helms JA, Jacobs CR, Stearns T.

Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2008 Sep;291(9):1074-8. doi: 10.1002/ar.20754.

33.

Eya1 and Six1 promote neurogenesis in the cranial placodes in a SoxB1-dependent fashion.

Schlosser G, Awtry T, Brugmann SA, Jensen ED, Neilson K, Ruan G, Stammler A, Voelker D, Yan B, Zhang C, Klymkowsky MW, Moody SA.

Dev Biol. 2008 Aug 1;320(1):199-214. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.05.523. Epub 2008 May 20.

34.

A dermal HOX transcriptional program regulates site-specific epidermal fate.

Rinn JL, Wang JK, Allen N, Brugmann SA, Mikels AJ, Liu H, Ridky TW, Stadler HS, Nusse R, Helms JA, Chang HY.

Genes Dev. 2008 Feb 1;22(3):303-7. doi: 10.1101/gad.1610508.

35.

The origins of species-specific facial morphology: the proof is in the pigeon.

Helms JA, Brugmann SA.

Integr Comp Biol. 2007 Sep;47(3):338-42. doi: 10.1093/icb/icm051. Epub 2007 Jun 22.

PMID:
21672843
36.

Wnt signaling mediates regional specification in the vertebrate face.

Brugmann SA, Goodnough LH, Gregorieff A, Leucht P, ten Berge D, Fuerer C, Clevers H, Nusse R, Helms JA.

Development. 2007 Sep;134(18):3283-95. Epub 2007 Aug 15.

37.

Functional demarcation of active and silent chromatin domains in human HOX loci by noncoding RNAs.

Rinn JL, Kertesz M, Wang JK, Squazzo SL, Xu X, Brugmann SA, Goodnough LH, Helms JA, Farnham PJ, Segal E, Chang HY.

Cell. 2007 Jun 29;129(7):1311-23.

38.

Stage-dependent craniofacial defects resulting from Sprouty2 overexpression.

Goodnough LH, Brugmann SA, Hu D, Helms JA.

Dev Dyn. 2007 Jul;236(7):1918-28.

39.

Looking different: understanding diversity in facial form.

Brugmann SA, Kim J, Helms JA.

Am J Med Genet A. 2006 Dec 1;140(23):2521-9.

PMID:
16838331
40.

The molecular origins of species-specific facial pattern.

Brugmann SA, Tapadia MD, Helms JA.

Curr Top Dev Biol. 2006;73:1-42. Review.

PMID:
16782454
41.
42.

Six1 promotes a placodal fate within the lateral neurogenic ectoderm by functioning as both a transcriptional activator and repressor.

Brugmann SA, Pandur PD, Kenyon KL, Pignoni F, Moody SA.

Development. 2004 Dec;131(23):5871-81. Epub 2004 Nov 3.

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