Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Adv. 2016 Apr 22;2(4):e1501252. doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1501252. eCollection 2016 Apr.

An extensive reef system at the Amazon River mouth.

Author information

1
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 21941-599, Brazil.; Laboratório de Sistemas Avançados de Gestão da Produção, Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa de Engenharia, COPPE, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 21941-972, Brazil.
2
Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 22460-030, Brazil.
3
Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 22460-030, Brazil.; Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ 20940-040, Brazil.
4
Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP CEP 05508-120, Brazil.
5
Departamento de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória ES CEP 29199-970, Brazil.
6
Laboratório de Ciências Ambientais, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes RJ CEP 28013-602, Brazil.
7
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 21941-599, Brazil.
8
Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói RJ CEP 24210-346, Brazil.
9
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói RJ CEP 24210-130, Brazil.
10
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 21941-599, Brazil.; Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ 20940-040, Brazil.
11
Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro RJ 20940-040, Brazil.
12
Instituto de Estudos Costeiros, Universidade Federal do Pará, Bragança PA CEP 68600-000, Brazil.
13
Departmento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Santos SP CEP 11070-100, Brazil.
14
Departamento de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife PE CEP 50670-901, Brazil.
15
Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2626, USA.
16
Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Rio Tinto PB CEP 58297000, Brazil.
17
Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, BA CEP 45650-000, Brazil.
18
Laboratório de Sistemas Avançados de Gestão da Produção, Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa de Engenharia, COPPE, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro RJ CEP 21941-972, Brazil.

Abstract

Large rivers create major gaps in reef distribution along tropical shelves. The Amazon River represents 20% of the global riverine discharge to the ocean, generating up to a 1.3 × 10(6)-km(2) plume, and extensive muddy bottoms in the equatorial margin of South America. As a result, a wide area of the tropical North Atlantic is heavily affected in terms of salinity, pH, light penetration, and sedimentation. Such unfavorable conditions were thought to imprint a major gap in Western Atlantic reefs. We present an extensive carbonate system off the Amazon mouth, underneath the river plume. Significant carbonate sedimentation occurred during lowstand sea level, and still occurs in the outer shelf, resulting in complex hard-bottom topography. A permanent near-bottom wedge of ocean water, together with the seasonal nature of the plume's eastward retroflection, conditions the existence of this extensive (~9500 km(2)) hard-bottom mosaic. The Amazon reefs transition from accretive to erosional structures and encompass extensive rhodolith beds. Carbonate structures function as a connectivity corridor for wide depth-ranging reef-associated species, being heavily colonized by large sponges and other structure-forming filter feeders that dwell under low light and high levels of particulates. The oxycline between the plume and subplume is associated with chemoautotrophic and anaerobic microbial metabolisms. The system described here provides several insights about the responses of tropical reefs to suboptimal and marginal reef-building conditions, which are accelerating worldwide due to global changes.

KEYWORDS:

Marine biogeography; coral reefs; mineralization; phase shifts; stepping stones

PMID:
27152336
PMCID:
PMC4846441
DOI:
10.1126/sciadv.1501252
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center