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Items: 1 to 50 of 80

1.

The Promise and Perils of Compound Discovery Screening with Inducible Pluripotent Cell-Derived Neurons.

Sharlow ER, Koseoglu MM, Bloom GS, Lazo JS.

Assay Drug Dev Technol. 2019 May 16. doi: 10.1089/adt.2019.914. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31095406
2.

Aberrant Neuronal Cell Cycle Re-Entry: The Pathological Confluence of Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Insulin Resistance, and Its Relation to Cancer.

Koseoglu MM, Norambuena A, Sharlow ER, Lazo JS, Bloom GS.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2019;67(1):1-11. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180874.

PMID:
30452418
3.

A novel lysosome-to-mitochondria signaling pathway disrupted by amyloid-β oligomers.

Norambuena A, Wallrabe H, Cao R, Wang DB, Silva A, Svindrych Z, Periasamy A, Hu S, Tanzi RE, Kim DY, Bloom GS.

EMBO J. 2018 Nov 15;37(22). pii: e100241. doi: 10.15252/embj.2018100241. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

PMID:
30348864
4.

N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated calcium influx connects amyloid-β oligomers to ectopic neuronal cell cycle reentry in Alzheimer's disease.

Kodis EJ, Choi S, Swanson E, Ferreira G, Bloom GS.

Alzheimers Dement. 2018 Oct;14(10):1302-1312. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.05.017. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

PMID:
30293574
5.

Bidirectional modulation of Alzheimer phenotype by alpha-synuclein in mice and primary neurons.

Khan SS, LaCroix M, Boyle G, Sherman MA, Brown JL, Amar F, Aldaco J, Lee MK, Bloom GS, Lesné SE.

Acta Neuropathol. 2018 Oct;136(4):589-605. doi: 10.1007/s00401-018-1886-z. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

PMID:
29995210
6.

Reduced brain insulin signaling: A seminal process in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

Bloom GS, Lazo JS, Norambuena A.

Neuropharmacology. 2018 Jul 1;136(Pt B):192-195. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.09.016. Epub 2017 Sep 29. Review.

7.

Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction.

Swanson E, Breckenridge L, McMahon L, Som S, McConnell I, Bloom GS.

J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;58(3):803-820. doi: 10.3233/JAD-170168.

8.

mTOR and neuronal cell cycle reentry: How impaired brain insulin signaling promotes Alzheimer's disease.

Norambuena A, Wallrabe H, McMahon L, Silva A, Swanson E, Khan SS, Baerthlein D, Kodis E, Oddo S, Mandell JW, Bloom GS.

Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Feb;13(2):152-167. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2016.08.015. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

9.

A Small Molecule Screen Exposes mTOR Signaling Pathway Involvement in Radiation-Induced Apoptosis.

Sharlow ER, Leimgruber S, Lira A, McConnell MJ, Norambuena A, Bloom GS, Epperly MW, Greenberger JS, Lazo JS.

ACS Chem Biol. 2016 May 20;11(5):1428-37. doi: 10.1021/acschembio.5b00909. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

10.

Tau: The Center of a Signaling Nexus in Alzheimer's Disease.

Khan SS, Bloom GS.

Front Neurosci. 2016 Feb 9;10:31. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2016.00031. eCollection 2016. Review.

11.

IQGAP3 is essential for cell proliferation and motility during zebrafish embryonic development.

Fang X, Zhang B, Thisse B, Bloom GS, Thisse C.

Cytoskeleton (Hoboken). 2015 Aug;72(8):422-33. doi: 10.1002/cm.21237. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

12.
13.

Identification of a gene regulatory network associated with prion replication.

Marbiah MM, Harvey A, West BT, Louzolo A, Banerjee P, Alden J, Grigoriadis A, Hummerich H, Kan HM, Cai Y, Bloom GS, Jat P, Collinge J, Klöhn PC.

EMBO J. 2014 Jul 17;33(14):1527-47. doi: 10.15252/embj.201387150. Epub 2014 May 19.

14.

Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

Bloom GS.

JAMA Neurol. 2014 Apr;71(4):505-8. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.5847. Review.

PMID:
24493463
15.

IQGAP1 interactome analysis by in vitro reconstitution and live cell 3-color FRET microscopy.

Wallrabe H, Cai Y, Sun Y, Periasamy A, Luzes R, Fang X, Kan HM, Cameron LC, Schafer DA, Bloom GS.

Cytoskeleton (Hoboken). 2013 Dec;70(12):819-36. doi: 10.1002/cm.21146. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

16.

Helicobacter pylori-induced alteration of epithelial cell signaling and polarity: a possible mechanism of gastric carcinoma etiology and disparity.

Osman MA, Bloom GS, Tagoe EA.

Cytoskeleton (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;70(7):349-59. doi: 10.1002/cm.21114. Epub 2013 Jul 3. Review.

17.

IQGAP1 suppresses TβRII-mediated myofibroblastic activation and metastatic growth in liver.

Liu C, Billadeau DD, Abdelhakim H, Leof E, Kaibuchi K, Bernabeu C, Bloom GS, Yang L, Boardman L, Shah VH, Kang N.

J Clin Invest. 2013 Mar;123(3):1138-56. doi: 10.1172/JCI63836. Epub 2013 Feb 1.

18.

Amyloid-β signals through tau to drive ectopic neuronal cell cycle re-entry in Alzheimer's disease.

Seward ME, Swanson E, Norambuena A, Reimann A, Cochran JN, Li R, Roberson ED, Bloom GS.

J Cell Sci. 2013 Mar 1;126(Pt 5):1278-86. doi: 10.1242/jcs.1125880. Epub 2013 Jan 23.

19.

EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau in Alzheimer's disease.

Ferrer-Acosta Y, Rodríguez-Cruz EN, Orange F, De Jesús-Cortés H, Madera B, Vaquer-Alicea J, Ballester J, Guinel MJ, Bloom GS, Vega IE.

J Neurochem. 2013 Jun;125(6):921-31. doi: 10.1111/jnc.12155. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

20.

Alzheimer disease: a tale of two prions.

Nussbaum JM, Seward ME, Bloom GS.

Prion. 2013 Jan-Feb;7(1):14-9. doi: 10.4161/pri.22118. Epub 2012 Sep 10. Review.

21.

Prion-like behaviour and tau-dependent cytotoxicity of pyroglutamylated amyloid-β.

Nussbaum JM, Schilling S, Cynis H, Silva A, Swanson E, Wangsanut T, Tayler K, Wiltgen B, Hatami A, Rönicke R, Reymann K, Hutter-Paier B, Alexandru A, Jagla W, Graubner S, Glabe CG, Demuth HU, Bloom GS.

Nature. 2012 May 2;485(7400):651-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11060.

22.

Cytoskeletal pathologies of Alzheimer disease.

Bamburg JR, Bloom GS.

Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 2009 Aug;66(8):635-49. doi: 10.1002/cm.20388. Review.

23.

Regulation of research through research governance: within and beyond NSW Health.

Bloom GS, Frew D.

N S W Public Health Bull. 2008 Nov-Dec;19(11-12):199-202.

PMID:
19126392
24.

Menin interacts with IQGAP1 to enhance intercellular adhesion of beta-cells.

Yan J, Yang Y, Zhang H, King C, Kan HM, Cai Y, Yuan CX, Bloom GS, Hua X.

Oncogene. 2009 Feb 19;28(7):973-82. doi: 10.1038/onc.2008.435. Epub 2008 Dec 15.

25.

IQGAP1 regulates cell motility by linking growth factor signaling to actin assembly.

Benseñor LB, Kan HM, Wang N, Wallrabe H, Davidson LA, Cai Y, Schafer DA, Bloom GS.

J Cell Sci. 2007 Feb 15;120(Pt 4):658-69. Epub 2007 Jan 30.

26.

Tau-dependent microtubule disassembly initiated by prefibrillar beta-amyloid.

King ME, Kan HM, Baas PW, Erisir A, Glabe CG, Bloom GS.

J Cell Biol. 2006 Nov 20;175(4):541-6. Epub 2006 Nov 13.

27.

Cultured cell and transgenic mouse models for tau pathology linked to beta-amyloid.

Bloom GS, Ren K, Glabe CG.

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2005 Jan 3;1739(2-3):116-24. Review.

28.

Nucleotide variants within the IQGAP1 gene in diffuse-type gastric cancers.

Morris LE, Bloom GS, Frierson HF Jr, Powell SM.

Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2005 Mar;42(3):280-6.

PMID:
15611933
29.

Actin filament binding by a monomeric IQGAP1 fragment with a single calponin homology domain.

Mateer SC, Morris LE, Cromer DA, Benseñor LB, Bloom GS.

Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 2004 Aug;58(4):231-41.

PMID:
15236354
30.

IQGAP1, a novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor binding protein, is involved in reactive oxygen species--dependent endothelial migration and proliferation.

Yamaoka-Tojo M, Ushio-Fukai M, Hilenski L, Dikalov SI, Chen YE, Tojo T, Fukai T, Fujimoto M, Patrushev NA, Wang N, Kontos CD, Bloom GS, Alexander RW.

Circ Res. 2004 Aug 6;95(3):276-83. Epub 2004 Jun 24.

PMID:
15217908
31.

IQGAPs: integrators of the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion machinery, and signaling networks.

Mateer SC, Wang N, Bloom GS.

Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 2003 Jul;55(3):147-55. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
12789660
32.

Dual control of caveolar membrane traffic by microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton.

Mundy DI, Machleidt T, Ying YS, Anderson RG, Bloom GS.

J Cell Sci. 2002 Nov 15;115(Pt 22):4327-39.

33.

The mechanism for regulation of the F-actin binding activity of IQGAP1 by calcium/calmodulin.

Mateer SC, McDaniel AE, Nicolas V, Habermacher GM, Lin MJ, Cromer DA, King ME, Bloom GS.

J Biol Chem. 2002 Apr 5;277(14):12324-33. Epub 2002 Jan 24.

34.

The UNC-104/KIF1 family of kinesins.

Bloom GS.

Curr Opin Cell Biol. 2001 Feb;13(1):36-40. Review.

PMID:
11163131
35.

Molecular interactions among protein phosphatase 2A, tau, and microtubules. Implications for the regulation of tau phosphorylation and the development of tauopathies.

Sontag E, Nunbhakdi-Craig V, Lee G, Brandt R, Kamibayashi C, Kuret J, White CL 3rd, Mumby MC, Bloom GS.

J Biol Chem. 1999 Sep 3;274(36):25490-8.

36.

In vitro reconstitution of microtubule plus end-directed, GTPgammaS-sensitive motility of Golgi membranes.

Fullerton AT, Bau MY, Conrad PA, Bloom GS.

Mol Biol Cell. 1998 Oct;9(10):2699-714.

38.

58K, a microtubule-binding Golgi protein, is a formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase.

Bashour AM, Bloom GS.

J Biol Chem. 1998 Jul 31;273(31):19612-7.

39.

Cruising along microtubule highways: how membranes move through the secretory pathway.

Bloom GS, Goldstein LS.

J Cell Biol. 1998 Mar 23;140(6):1277-80. Review. No abstract available. Erratum in: J Cell Biol 1998 May 18;141(4):1095.

40.

IQGAP1, a Rac- and Cdc42-binding protein, directly binds and cross-links microfilaments.

Bashour AM, Fullerton AT, Hart MJ, Bloom GS.

J Cell Biol. 1997 Jun 30;137(7):1555-66.

41.

Regulation of the phosphorylation state and microtubule-binding activity of Tau by protein phosphatase 2A.

Sontag E, Nunbhakdi-Craig V, Lee G, Bloom GS, Mumby MC.

Neuron. 1996 Dec;17(6):1201-7.

42.

Biology of the congenitally hypothyroid hyt/hyt mouse.

Biesiada E, Adams PM, Shanklin DR, Bloom GS, Stein SA.

Adv Neuroimmunol. 1996;6(4):309-46. Review.

PMID:
9183515
43.

Caveolin cycles between plasma membrane caveolae and the Golgi complex by microtubule-dependent and microtubule-independent steps.

Conrad PA, Smart EJ, Ying YS, Anderson RG, Bloom GS.

J Cell Biol. 1995 Dec;131(6 Pt 1):1421-33.

44.

A novel pool of protein phosphatase 2A is associated with microtubules and is regulated during the cell cycle.

Sontag E, Nunbhakdi-Craig V, Bloom GS, Mumby MC.

J Cell Biol. 1995 Mar;128(6):1131-44.

45.

Kinesin is the motor for microtubule-mediated Golgi-to-ER membrane traffic.

Lippincott-Schwartz J, Cole NB, Marotta A, Conrad PA, Bloom GS.

J Cell Biol. 1995 Feb;128(3):293-306. Erratum in: J Cell Biol 1995 Mar;128(5):following 988. J Cell Biol 1995 May;129(3):893.

46.

Motor proteins 1: kinesins.

Bloom GS, Endow SA.

Protein Profile. 1995;2(10):1105-71. Review.

PMID:
8542443
47.

Fast axonal transport of kinesin in the rat visual system: functionality of kinesin heavy chain isoforms.

Elluru RG, Bloom GS, Brady ST.

Mol Biol Cell. 1995 Jan;6(1):21-40. Erratum in: Mol Biol Cell 1995 Sep;6(9):1261.

48.

Motor proteins. 1: kinesins.

Bloom GS, Endow SA.

Protein Profile. 1994;1(10):1059-116. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
8528901
49.

GTP gamma S inhibits organelle transport along axonal microtubules.

Bloom GS, Richards BW, Leopold PL, Ritchey DM, Brady ST.

J Cell Biol. 1993 Jan;120(2):467-76.

50.

Motor proteins for cytoplasmic microtubules.

Bloom GS.

Curr Opin Cell Biol. 1992 Feb;4(1):66-73. Review. Erratum in: Curr Opin Cell Biol 1992 Jun;4(3):502.

PMID:
1532721

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