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J Dent Educ. 2019 May;83(5):504-509. doi: 10.21815/JDE.019.057. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Defining Endodontic Residents' Clinical Experiences: A National Survey.

Author information

1
Jonathan D. Blacher, DMD, MSD, was an Endodontic Resident, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, when this study was conducted; Kamran E. Safavi, DMD, MEd, is Chair and Program Director, Division of Endodontology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; Robert H. Aseltine, PhD, is Professor, Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences Department, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; and Blythe M. Kaufman, DMD, MS, is Associate Professor, Division of Endodontology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine. jblacherendodontics@gmail.com.
2
Jonathan D. Blacher, DMD, MSD, was an Endodontic Resident, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, when this study was conducted; Kamran E. Safavi, DMD, MEd, is Chair and Program Director, Division of Endodontology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; Robert H. Aseltine, PhD, is Professor, Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences Department, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine; and Blythe M. Kaufman, DMD, MS, is Associate Professor, Division of Endodontology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine.

Abstract

Endodontic residency programs across the U.S. vary in the exposure they provide to residents in procedures, protocols, and equipment. Having information on the range of clinical experiences provided in programs would be useful for program directors and for applicants who are seeking the best fit for their residency. The aim of this study was to collect information from residents in U.S. endodontic residency programs about the procedures and equipment they experienced in their programs. In January 2018, a 14-question survey was emailed to all 437 endodontic residents with an email address in the 2016-17 American Association of Endodontists Membership Directory. Survey items asked about the number of endodontic procedures, techniques employed, and products used in residents' programs. A total of 133 endodontic residents responded to all or part of the survey, for a 30% response rate. The majority reported completing 151-250 nonsurgical root canals, 26-50 nonsurgical retreatments, 0-10 surgical retreatments, and 0-10 regenerative endodontic procedures during their residencies. All respondents said they used a surgical operating microscope (SOM), and 82% reported using a multi-file rotary system for nonsurgical procedures. Respondents reported that the main instruments they used were Dentsply Sirona file systems, and the most commonly used obturation technique was warm vertical compaction/condensation, reported by 92% of respondents. These endodontic residents reported being exposed to a variety of procedures, products, and protocols during their residency. Based on information they provided, prospective endodontic residency applicants can expect to use the SOM for treatment, to gain extensive experience in primary nonsurgical endodontic treatment, and to not perform endodontic surgery during their first year of postgraduate training.

KEYWORDS:

advanced dental education; clinical experiences; clinical performance; endodontics; endodontics programs; obturation technique; root canal

PMID:
30804173
DOI:
10.21815/JDE.019.057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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