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Items: 1 to 50 of 90

1.

Auditory-frontal Channeling in α and β Bands is Altered by Age-related Hearing Loss and Relates to Speech Perception in Noise.

Price CN, Alain C, Bidelman GM.

Neuroscience. 2019 Nov 6. pii: S0306-4522(19)30743-2. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.10.044. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31705894
2.

Frontal cortex selectively overrides auditory processing to bias perception for looming sonic motion.

Bidelman GM, Myers MH.

Brain Res. 2019 Oct 10:146507. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2019.146507. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31606413
3.

Afferent-efferent connectivity between auditory brainstem and cortex accounts for poorer speech-in-noise comprehension in older adults.

Bidelman GM, Price CN, Shen D, Arnott SR, Alain C.

Hear Res. 2019 Oct;382:107795. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2019.107795. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

PMID:
31479953
4.

Acoustic noise and vision differentially warp the auditory categorization of speech.

Bidelman GM, Sigley L, Lewis GA.

J Acoust Soc Am. 2019 Jul;146(1):60. doi: 10.1121/1.5114822.

PMID:
31370660
5.

Age-related hearing loss increases full-brain connectivity while reversing directed signaling within the dorsal-ventral pathway for speech.

Bidelman GM, Mahmud MS, Yeasin M, Shen D, Arnott SR, Alain C.

Brain Struct Funct. 2019 Nov;224(8):2661-2676. doi: 10.1007/s00429-019-01922-9. Epub 2019 Jul 25.

PMID:
31346715
6.

Plasticity in auditory categorization is supported by differential engagement of the auditory-linguistic network.

Bidelman GM, Walker B.

Neuroimage. 2019 Nov 1;201:116022. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116022. Epub 2019 Jul 13.

PMID:
31310863
7.

Psychobiological Responses Reveal Audiovisual Noise Differentially Challenges Speech Recognition.

Bidelman GM, Brown B, Mankel K, Nelms Price C.

Ear Hear. 2019 Jul 2. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000755. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
31283529
8.

Acoustic Correlates and Adult Perceptions of Distress in Infant Speech-Like Vocalizations and Cries.

Yoo H, Buder EH, Bowman DD, Bidelman GM, Oller DK.

Front Psychol. 2019 May 29;10:1154. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01154. eCollection 2019.

9.

Predicting Speech Recognition Using the Speech Intelligibility Index and Other Variables for Cochlear Implant Users.

Lee S, Mendel LL, Bidelman GM.

J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2019 May 21;62(5):1517-1531. doi: 10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0303.

10.

A Single-Channel EEG-Based Approach to Detect Mild Cognitive Impairment via Speech-Evoked Brain Responses.

Khatun S, Morshed BI, Bidelman GM.

IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2019 May;27(5):1063-1070. doi: 10.1109/TNSRE.2019.2911970. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

PMID:
30998476
11.

Linguistic, perceptual, and cognitive factors underlying musicians' benefits in noise-degraded speech perception.

Yoo J, Bidelman GM.

Hear Res. 2019 Jun;377:189-195. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.021. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

PMID:
30978607
12.

Music and Visual Art Training Modulate Brain Activity in Older Adults.

Alain C, Moussard A, Singer J, Lee Y, Bidelman GM, Moreno S.

Front Neurosci. 2019 Mar 8;13:182. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2019.00182. eCollection 2019.

13.

Brainstem correlates of concurrent speech identification in adverse listening conditions.

Yellamsetty A, Bidelman GM.

Brain Res. 2019 Jul 1;1714:182-192. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2019.02.025. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

PMID:
30796895
14.

Reply to Schellenberg: Is there more to auditory plasticity than meets the ear?

Bidelman GM, Mankel K.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 Feb 19;116(8):2785-2786. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1900068116. Epub 2019 Jan 29. No abstract available.

15.

Neural Correlates of Enhanced Audiovisual Processing in the Bilingual Brain.

Bidelman GM, Heath ST.

Neuroscience. 2019 Mar 1;401:11-20. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.01.003. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

PMID:
30639306
16.

Inherent auditory skills rather than formal music training shape the neural encoding of speech.

Mankel K, Bidelman GM.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Dec 18;115(51):13129-13134. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1811793115. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

17.

BRAINsens: Body-Worn Reconfigurable Architecture of Integrated Network Sensors.

Mahajan R, Morshed BI, Bidelman GM.

J Med Syst. 2018 Aug 30;42(10):185. doi: 10.1007/s10916-018-1036-0.

PMID:
30167826
18.

Brainstem-cortical functional connectivity for speech is differentially challenged by noise and reverberation.

Bidelman GM, Davis MK, Pridgen MH.

Hear Res. 2018 Sep;367:149-160. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2018.05.018. Epub 2018 May 26.

19.

Subcortical sources dominate the neuroelectric auditory frequency-following response to speech.

Bidelman GM.

Neuroimage. 2018 Jul 15;175:56-69. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.03.060. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

PMID:
29604459
20.

Test-Retest Reliability of Dual-Recorded Brainstem versus Cortical Auditory-Evoked Potentials to Speech.

Bidelman GM, Pousson M, Dugas C, Fehrenbach A.

J Am Acad Audiol. 2018 Feb;29(2):164-174. doi: 10.3766/jaaa.16167.

PMID:
29401063
21.

Low- and high-frequency cortical brain oscillations reflect dissociable mechanisms of concurrent speech segregation in noise.

Yellamsetty A, Bidelman GM.

Hear Res. 2018 Apr;361:92-102. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2018.01.006. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

PMID:
29398142
22.

A pilot investigation of audiovisual processing and multisensory integration in patients with inherited retinal dystrophies.

Myers MH, Iannaccone A, Bidelman GM.

BMC Ophthalmol. 2017 Dec 7;17(1):240. doi: 10.1186/s12886-017-0640-y.

23.

Sonification of scalp-recorded frequency-following responses (FFRs) offers improved response detection over conventional statistical metrics.

Bidelman GM.

J Neurosci Methods. 2018 Jan 1;293:59-66. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.09.005. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

PMID:
28917659
24.

Noise and pitch interact during the cortical segregation of concurrent speech.

Bidelman GM, Yellamsetty A.

Hear Res. 2017 Aug;351:34-44. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2017.05.008. Epub 2017 May 25.

PMID:
28578876
25.

Mild Cognitive Impairment Is Characterized by Deficient Brainstem and Cortical Representations of Speech.

Bidelman GM, Lowther JE, Tak SH, Alain C.

J Neurosci. 2017 Mar 29;37(13):3610-3620. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3700-16.2017. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

26.

Design and validation of a wearable "DRL-less" EEG using a novel fully-reconfigurable architecture.

Mahajan R, Morshed BI, Bidelman GM.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2016 Aug;2016:4999-5002. doi: 10.1109/EMBC.2016.7591850.

PMID:
28269391
27.

Amplified induced neural oscillatory activity predicts musicians' benefits in categorical speech perception.

Bidelman GM.

Neuroscience. 2017 Apr 21;348:107-113. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.02.015. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

PMID:
28214576
28.

Notched-noise precursors improve detection of low-frequency amplitude modulation.

Almishaal A, Bidelman GM, Jennings SG.

J Acoust Soc Am. 2017 Jan;141(1):324. doi: 10.1121/1.4973912.

29.

Objective Identification of Simulated Cochlear Implant Settings in Normal-Hearing Listeners Via Auditory Cortical Evoked Potentials.

Lee S, Bidelman GM.

Ear Hear. 2017 Jul/Aug;38(4):e215-e226. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000403.

PMID:
28125444
30.

Attentional modulation and domain-specificity underlying the neural organization of auditory categorical perception.

Bidelman GM, Walker BS.

Eur J Neurosci. 2017 Mar;45(5):690-699. doi: 10.1111/ejn.13526. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

PMID:
28112440
31.

Neural Correlates of Speech Segregation Based on Formant Frequencies of Adjacent Vowels.

Alain C, Arsenault JS, Garami L, Bidelman GM, Snyder JS.

Sci Rep. 2017 Jan 19;7:40790. doi: 10.1038/srep40790.

32.

Musicianship enhances ipsilateral and contralateral efferent gain control to the cochlea.

Bidelman GM, Schneider AD, Heitzmann VR, Bhagat SP.

Hear Res. 2017 Feb;344:275-283. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2016.12.001. Epub 2016 Dec 11.

PMID:
27964936
33.
34.
35.

Musicianship and Tone Language Experience Are Associated with Differential Changes in Brain Signal Variability.

Hutka S, Carpentier SM, Bidelman GM, Moreno S, McIntosh AR.

J Cogn Neurosci. 2016 Dec;28(12):2044-2058. Epub 2016 Aug 30.

PMID:
27574873
36.

Musicians have enhanced audiovisual multisensory binding: experience-dependent effects in the double-flash illusion.

Bidelman GM.

Exp Brain Res. 2016 Oct;234(10):3037-47. doi: 10.1007/s00221-016-4705-6. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

PMID:
27334887
37.

Auditory perceptual restoration and illusory continuity correlates in the human brainstem.

Bidelman GM, Patro C.

Brain Res. 2016 Sep 1;1646:84-90. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2016.05.050. Epub 2016 May 27.

PMID:
27241211
38.

Cortical encoding and neurophysiological tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns in native and nonnative speakers.

Chung WL, Bidelman GM.

Brain Lang. 2016 Apr-May;155-156:49-57. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2016.04.004. Epub 2016 Apr 30.

PMID:
27140864
39.

Objective detection of auditory steady-state evoked potentials based on mutual information.

Bidelman GM, Bhagat SP.

Int J Audiol. 2016;55(5):313-9. doi: 10.3109/14992027.2016.1141246. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

PMID:
26924597
40.

Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

Bidelman GM, Nelms C, Bhagat SP.

Hear Res. 2016 May;335:40-46. doi: 10.1016/j.heares.2016.02.012. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

PMID:
26900073
41.

On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

Cousineau M, Bidelman GM, Peretz I, Lehmann A.

PLoS One. 2015 Dec 31;10(12):e0145439. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0145439. eCollection 2015.

42.

Cognitive and neural plasticity in older adults' prospective memory following training with the Virtual Week computer game.

Rose NS, Rendell PG, Hering A, Kliegel M, Bidelman GM, Craik FI.

Front Hum Neurosci. 2015 Oct 28;9:592. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00592. eCollection 2015.

43.

PsyAcoustX: A flexible MATLAB(®) package for psychoacoustics research.

Bidelman GM, Jennings SG, Strickland EA.

Front Psychol. 2015 Oct 12;6:1498. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01498. eCollection 2015.

44.

Functional changes in inter- and intra-hemispheric cortical processing underlying degraded speech perception.

Bidelman GM, Howell M.

Neuroimage. 2016 Jan 1;124(Pt A):581-590. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.020. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

PMID:
26386346
45.

Tone-language speakers show hemispheric specialization and differential cortical processing of contour and interval cues for pitch.

Bidelman GM, Chung WL.

Neuroscience. 2015 Oct 1;305:384-92. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.08.010. Epub 2015 Aug 8.

PMID:
26265549
46.

Sensitivity of the cortical pitch onset response to height, time-variance, and directionality of dynamic pitch.

Bidelman GM.

Neurosci Lett. 2015 Aug 31;603:89-93. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2015.07.018. Epub 2015 Jul 19.

PMID:
26200250
47.

Effects of language experience and stimulus context on the neural organization and categorical perception of speech.

Bidelman GM, Lee CC.

Neuroimage. 2015 Oct 15;120:191-200. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.06.087. Epub 2015 Jul 3.

PMID:
26146197
48.

Right-ear advantage drives the link between olivocochlear efferent 'antimasking' and speech-in-noise listening benefits.

Bidelman GM, Bhagat SP.

Neuroreport. 2015 May 27;26(8):483-7. doi: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000376.

PMID:
25919996
49.

Pitch expertise is not created equal: Cross-domain effects of musicianship and tone language experience on neural and behavioural discrimination of speech and music.

Hutka S, Bidelman GM, Moreno S.

Neuropsychologia. 2015 May;71:52-63. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.03.019. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

PMID:
25797590
50.

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