Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2019 Feb 4;10(1):590. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-08220-8.

Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions.

Author information

1
Department of Archaeogenetics, Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaische Strasse 10, D-07745, Jena, Germany. wang@xmu.edu.cn.
2
Department of Anthropology and Ethnology, Institute of Anthropology, Xiamen University, 361005, Xiamen, China. wang@xmu.edu.cn.
3
German Archaeological Institute, Eurasia Department, Im Dol 2-6, D-14195, Berlin, Germany.
4
'Nasledie' Cultural Heritage Unit, 355006, Stavropol, Russia.
5
Department of Archaeogenetics, Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaische Strasse 10, D-07745, Jena, Germany.
6
Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
7
Department of Anthropology, University of Vienna, 1090, Vienna, Austria.
8
School of Archaeology, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
9
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115, MA, USA.
10
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115, MA, USA.
11
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.
12
Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA.
13
Department of Archaeology, Faculty of History, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky pr. 27/4, 119192, Moscow, Russia.
14
Institute of Archaeology RAS, Ul. Dm. Ulyanova 19, 117036, Moscow, Russian Federation.
15
State Museum of Oriental Art, 12a Nikitskiy Boulevard, 119019, Moscow, Russian Federation.
16
Ltd. Institute for Caucasus Archaeology, Ul. Katkhanova 30, 361401, Nalchik, Republic Kabardino-Balkaria, Russian Federation.
17
Institute of History, Archaeology and Ethnography DNC RAS, Ul. M. Jaragskogo 75, 367030, Makhachkala, Republic Dagestan, Russian Federation.
18
Department of Anthropology, Wellesley College, Pendleton East 331, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA, 02481, USA.
19
Danube Private University, A-3500, Krems-Stein, Austria.
20
IPAS-Institute of Prehistory and Archaeological Science, University of Basel, CH-4055, Basel, Switzerland.
21
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Basel, CH-4123, Allschwil, Switzerland.
22
State Heritage Museum, Saxony-Anhalt, D-06114, Halle/Saale, Germany.
23
Martin-Luther-Universität, Halle-Wittenberg, D-06108, Germany.
24
Shirak Center for Armenological Studies of National Academy of Science RA, Gyumri, 3101, Armenia.
25
Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Sciences, Dvortsovaya nab., 18, 191186, Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
26
Research Institute and Museum of Anthropology of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Mokhovaya 11, Moscow, 125009, Russia.
27
German Archaeological Institute, Department of Natural Sciences, Im Dol 2-6, D-14195, Berlin, Germany.
28
CRC 1266 "Scales of Transformation", Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Johanna-Mestorf-Straße 2-6, 24118, Kiel, Germany.
29
Curt Engelhorn Center for Archaeometry gGmbH, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.
30
Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Moscow, 115478, Russia.
31
Biobank of North Eurasia, Moscow, 115201, Russia.
32
Vavilov Institute for General Genetics, Moscow, 119991, Russia.
33
Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
34
Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, RLAHA, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX13QY, UK.
35
Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Sciences, Dvortsovaya nab.,18, 191186, Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
36
Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, 1010, Vienna, Austria.
37
Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.
38
German Archaeological Institute, Eurasia Department, Im Dol 2-6, D-14195, Berlin, Germany. svend.hansen@dainst.de.
39
Department of Archaeogenetics, Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaische Strasse 10, D-07745, Jena, Germany. krause@shh.mpg.de.
40
Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA. krause@shh.mpg.de.
41
Department of Archaeogenetics, Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaische Strasse 10, D-07745, Jena, Germany. haak@shh.mpg.de.
42
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia. haak@shh.mpg.de.

Abstract

Archaeogenetic studies have described the formation of Eurasian 'steppe ancestry' as a mixture of Eastern and Caucasus hunter-gatherers. However, it remains unclear when and where this ancestry arose and whether it was related to a horizon of cultural innovations in the 4th millennium BCE that subsequently facilitated the advance of pastoral societies in Eurasia. Here we generated genome-wide SNP data from 45 prehistoric individuals along a 3000-year temporal transect in the North Caucasus. We observe a genetic separation between the groups of the Caucasus and those of the adjacent steppe. The northern Caucasus groups are genetically similar to contemporaneous populations south of it, suggesting human movement across the mountain range during the Bronze Age. The steppe groups from Yamnaya and subsequent pastoralist cultures show evidence for previously undetected farmer-related ancestry from different contact zones, while Steppe Maykop individuals harbour additional Upper Palaeolithic Siberian and Native American related ancestry.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center