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J Cell Biol. 2017 Feb;216(2):463-476. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201605110. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

Author information

1
Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina.
2
Instituto de Fisiología Vegetal, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de La Plata Centro Científico Technológico La Plata CONICET, 1900 La Plata, Argentina.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027.
4
Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027.
5
Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 gpagnussat@mdp.edu.ar sjdixon@stanford.edu.
6
Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina gpagnussat@mdp.edu.ar sjdixon@stanford.edu.

Abstract

In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient.

Comment in

PMID:
28100685
PMCID:
PMC5294777
DOI:
10.1083/jcb.201605110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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