Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PeerJ. 2018 Dec 12;6:e6037. doi: 10.7717/peerj.6037. eCollection 2018.

Short-term interval aerobic exercise training does not improve memory functioning in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis-a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Institute for Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis (INIMS), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
2
Department for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.
3
Universitäres Kompetenzzentrum für Sport- und Bewegungsmedizin (Athleticum) und Institut und Poliklinik für Medizinische Psychologie, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
4
Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
5
Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
6
Department of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Abstract

Background:

Only few aerobic exercise intervention trials specifically targeting cognitive functioning have been performed in multiple sclerosis.

Objective and Methods:

This randomized controlled trial with 34 patients in the intervention group (IG) (mean: 38.2 years (±9.6)) and 34 patients in the control group (CG) (mean: 39.6 years (±9.7)) aimed to determine the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The primary outcome was verbal learning assessed by the verbal learning and memory test (VLMT). Patients were randomized to an IG or a waitlist CG. Patients in the IG exercised according to an individually tailored training schedule (with two to three sessions per week for 12 weeks). The primary analysis was carried out using the intention-to-treat (ITT) sample with ANCOVA adjusting for baseline scores.

Results:

A total of 77 patients with RRMS were screened and 68 participants randomized (CG n = 34; IG n = 34). The sample comprised 68% females, had a mean age of 39 years, a mean disease duration of 6.3 years, and a mean expanded disability status scale of 1.8. No significant effects were detected in the ITT analysis for the primary endpoint VLMT or any other cognitive measures. Moreover, no significant treatment effects were observed for quality of life, fatigue, or depressive symptoms.

Conclusion:

This study failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on cognition in RRMS. The trial was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02005237).

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic exercise training; Cognition; Memory function; Multiple sclerosis; Neuroimmunology; Neurorehabilitation

Conflict of interest statement

Jan-Patrick Stellmann received research grants and speaker honoraries from Biogen, Genzyme and Merck. Stefan Michael Gold has received research grants and honoraria from Biogen, Almirall and Mylan. Christoph Heesen received research grants and speaker honoraries from Biogen, Genzyme, Novartis and Merck. Helge Hasselmann, Stefan Patra, Eik Vettorazzi, Andreas K. Engel, Sina Cathérine Rosenkranz, Jana Poettgen, Karl-Heinz Schulz have no competing interests.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PeerJ, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center