Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 May 1;8(1):6819. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-23536-7.

Gas and seismicity within the Istanbul seismic gap.

Author information

1
Ifremer, Département Ressources Physiques et Ecosystèmes de fond de Mer (REM), Plouzané, F-29280, France. louis.geli@ifremer.fr.
2
CEREGE, Aix Marseille Univ., CNRS, IRD, INRA, Coll. France, Aix-Marseille, France.
3
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, USA.
4
Ifremer, Département Ressources Physiques et Ecosystèmes de fond de Mer (REM), Plouzané, F-29280, France.
5
Universidad de los Andes, Bogotà, Colombia.
6
ALomax Scientific, 06370, Mouans-Sartoux, France.
7
Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
8
Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.
9
Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK.
10
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
11
Mineral Research & Exploration General Directorate, MTA, Ankara, Turkey.
12
Institute for Marine Science and Technology, Dokuz Eyiul Universitesi, Izmir, Turkey.
13
Helmholtz-Centre Potsdam German Centre for Geosciences GFZ, Section 4.2 Geomechanics and Rheology, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam, Germany.
14
Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Earth Sciences, Malteser Strasse 74-100, 12249, Berlin, Germany.
15
Institute of Marine Science, ISMAR-CNR, Bologna, Italy.
16
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, INGV, Roma, Italy.
17
Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Abstract

Understanding micro-seismicity is a critical question for earthquake hazard assessment. Since the devastating earthquakes of Izmit and Duzce in 1999, the seismicity along the submerged section of North Anatolian Fault within the Sea of Marmara (comprising the "Istanbul seismic gap") has been extensively studied in order to infer its mechanical behaviour (creeping vs locked). So far, the seismicity has been interpreted only in terms of being tectonic-driven, although the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) is known to strike across multiple hydrocarbon gas sources. Here, we show that a large number of the aftershocks that followed the M 5.1 earthquake of July, 25th 2011 in the western Sea of Marmara, occurred within a zone of gas overpressuring in the 1.5-5 km depth range, from where pressurized gas is expected to migrate along the MMF, up to the surface sediment layers. Hence, gas-related processes should also be considered for a complete interpretation of the micro-seismicity (~M < 3) within the Istanbul offshore domain.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center