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BJGP Open. 2017 Jan 9;1(1):bjgpopen17X100725. doi: 10.3399/bjgpopen17X100725.

The specific needs of patients following sepsis: a nested qualitative interview study.

Author information

1
GP, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of General Practice, Berlin, Germany.
2
Physician, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of General Practice, Berlin, Germany.
3
Medical Student, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of General Practice, Berlin, Germany.
4
GP, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University, School of Medicine, Institute of General Practice and Family Medicine, Jena, Germany.
5
GP and Professor, Institute of General Practice, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
6
GP and Professor, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of General Practice, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Background:

Survivors of sepsis suffer from multiple critical disease sequelae when discharged to primary care. There is a lack of structured aftercare programmes and case managers may be helpful in caring for patients with chronic critical disease.

Aim:

To gain insight into the functioning of a structured aftercare programme for post-sepsis patients in general practice.

Design & setting:

A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with patients and GPs across Germany who participated in an randomised controlled trial of a structured aftercare programme for post-sepsis patients, which included patient education and case manager monitoring.

Method:

Qualitative interviews with 19 patients and 13 GPs were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results:

Patients appreciated the information given in the patient education session, but some disliked it because it reminded them of their serious illness. GPs appreciated patient education because well-informed patients are more likely to participate in follow-up. Patients appreciated the case monitoring because it made them feel safer and more cared for and helped them reflect on their health issues. However, some patients felt uncomfortable with the regular questioning. GPs appreciated the case management programme because they received regular clinical information. However some GPs were wary of the clinical relevance of the information, the delegation of the patient to the nurse, and efficiency of time. Both patients and GPs requested more clinical support, such as easier access to psychotherapists.

Conclusion:

In general, both patients and their GPs appreciated patient education and monitoring following sepsis. Patients' retrospections and worries about their serious illness need to be considered.

KEYWORDS:

aftercare; patient education as topic; primary health care; professional delegation; qualitative research; sepsis

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

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