Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2017 Aug 18;357(6352):680-683. doi: 10.1126/science.aam8378.

An unusual white dwarf star may be a surviving remnant of a subluminous Type Ia supernova.

Author information

1
Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, Fričova 298, CZ-251 65 Ondřejov, Czech Republic. vennes@asu.cas.cz.
2
Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte, Astronomical Institute, University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 Bamberg, Germany.
3
Astroserver.org, 8533 Malomsok, Hungary.
4
Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České republiky, Fričova 298, CZ-251 65 Ondřejov, Czech Republic.
5
Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755-3528, USA.
6
Département de physique et d'astronomie, Université de Moncton, Moncton, New Brunswick E1A 3E9, Canada.
7
Mathematical Sciences Institute, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.

Abstract

Subluminous Type Ia supernovae, such as the Type Iax-class prototype SN 2002cx, are described by a variety of models such as the failed detonation and partial deflagration of an accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarf star or the explosion of an accreting, hybrid carbon-oxygen-neon core. These models predict that bound remnants survive such events with, according to some simulations, a high kick velocity. We report the discovery of a high proper motion, low-mass white dwarf (LP 40-365) that travels at a velocity greater than the Galactic escape velocity and whose peculiar atmosphere is dominated by intermediate-mass elements. Strong evidence indicates that this partially burnt remnant was ejected following a subluminous Type Ia supernova event. This supports the viability of single-degenerate supernova progenitors.

PMID:
28818942
DOI:
10.1126/science.aam8378

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center