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Epidemiol Infect. 2018 Dec;146(16):2116-2121. doi: 10.1017/S0950268818002340. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Comparison of in situ sequence type analysis of Legionella pneumophila in respiratory tract secretions and environmental samples of a hospital in East Jerusalem.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology,Faculty of Medicine,Al-Quds University,Abu Dies, Palestine.
2
Department of Vaccinology and Applied Microbiology,Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI),Braunschweig,Germany.

Abstract

Legionella pneumophila genotyping is important for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial and community-acquired outbreaks of legionellosis. The prevalence of legionellosis in pneumonia patients in the West Bank was monitored for the first time, and the sequence types (STs) from respiratory samples were compared with STs of environmental samples from different wards of the hospital. Sputum (n = 121) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (n = 74) specimens were cultured for L. pneumophila; genomic DNA was tested by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Nested PCR sequence-based typing (NPSBT) was implemented on DNA of the respiratory and environmental PCR-positive samples. Only one respiratory specimen was positive for L. pneumophila by culture. BAL gave a higher percentage of L. pneumophila-positive samples, 35% (26/74) than sputum, 15% (18/121) by PCR. NPSBT revealed the following STs: ST 1 (29%, 7/24), ST 461 (21%, 5/24), ST 1037 (4%, 1/24) from respiratory samples, STs from environmental samples: ST 1 (28.5%, 4/14), ST 187 (21.4%, 3/14) and ST 2070, ST 461, ST 1482 (7.1%, 1/14) each. This study emphasises the advantage of PCR over culture for the detection of L. pneumophila in countries where antibiotics are indiscriminately used prior to hospital admission. ST 1 was the predominant ST in both respiratory and environmental samples.

KEYWORDS:

East Jerusalem; West Bank; legionellosis; sequence-based typing

PMID:
30157982
PMCID:
PMC6453007
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268818002340
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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