Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 May 17;8(1):7778. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-26266-y.

The Crotone Megalandslide, southern Italy: Architecture, timing and tectonic control.

Author information

1
(OGS) Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Borgo Grotta Gigante, 42/c, 34010, Sgonico, Trieste, Italy. mzecchin@inogs.it.
2
(OGS) Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Borgo Grotta Gigante, 42/c, 34010, Sgonico, Trieste, Italy.
3
Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra, Università della Calabria, 87036, Arcavacata di Rende, CS, Italy.
4
Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Arsenale - Tesa 104, Castello 2737/F, 30122, Venezia, Italy.
5
Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
6
Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Padua, via Marzolo 9, 35121, Padova, PD, Italy.
7
Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Arsenale - Tesa 104, Castello 2737/F, 30122, Venezia, Italy. luigi.tosi@ismar.cnr.it.

Abstract

Large-scale submarine gravitational land movements involving even more than 1,000 m thick sedimentary successions are known as megalandslides. We prove the existence of large-scale gravitational phenomena off the Crotone Basin, a forearc basin located on the Ionian side of Calabria (southern Italy), by seismic, morpho-bathymetric and well data. Our study reveals that the Crotone Megalandslide started moving between Late Zanclean and Early Piacenzian and was triggered by a contractional tectonic event leading to the basin inversion. Seaward gliding of the megalandslide continued until roughly Late Gelasian, and then resumed since Middle Pleistocene with a modest rate. Interestingly, the onshore part of the basin does not show a gravity-driven deformation comparable to that observed in the marine area, and this peculiar evidence allows some speculations on the origin of the megalandslide.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center