Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2019 Mar;47(1):82-90. doi: 10.29158/JAAPL.003826-19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Sharing Violent Thoughts on the Internet.

Author information

1
At the time this article was written, Dr. Abukamil was a Forensic Psychiatry Fellow, University of Cincinnati. Dr. Abukamil is currently a Staff Psychiatrist at Stein Hospital, Las Vegas, Nevada. Dr. Piel is Staff Psychiatrist, VA Puget Sound, and Assistant Professor and Associate Psychiatry Residency Program Director, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. rabukami@health.nv.gov.
2
At the time this article was written, Dr. Abukamil was a Forensic Psychiatry Fellow, University of Cincinnati. Dr. Abukamil is currently a Staff Psychiatrist at Stein Hospital, Las Vegas, Nevada. Dr. Piel is Staff Psychiatrist, VA Puget Sound, and Assistant Professor and Associate Psychiatry Residency Program Director, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

The anonymity of the Internet enables people to explore and share certain thoughts they may not feel comfortable sharing through traditional means. This is true for socially unacceptable thoughts, including violent and sexually sadistic fantasies. Despite one's relative freedom to explore virtually any subject anonymously, some Internet activities can attract unwanted attention from the media and law enforcement authorities. The case of former New York City police officer Gilberto Valle is illustrative of the problems that can be generated by online activities. This article discusses the case of United States v. Valle, 807 F.3d 508 (2nd Cir. 2015) and the tension between First Amendment protections and criminal activity. Forensic mental health experts may be well suited to educate the trier of fact about violent fantasies and their associated risks.

PMID:
30782605
DOI:
10.29158/JAAPL.003826-19

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center