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Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 1996 Jul;76(7):519-23.

[Obesity may have more pronounced effect on the occurrence of insulin resistance than hypertension].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical College, Fuzhou.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the extent of insulin resistance in hypertensive and in obesity patients and verify their role on the occurrence of insulin resistance.

METHODS:

Insulin sensitivity was assessed by using euglycemic insulin clamp technique (EICT) in normal subjects (NS, n = 36), obesity (n = 23), hypertensive non-obesity patients (HT+nonobesity, n = 51) and hypertensive and obesity patients (HT+obesity, n = 54) Glucose metabolism ratio (M) served as an index of insulin sensitivity.

RESULTS:

The height sequence of M value was: NS > HT+nonobesity > obesity > HT+obesity (ie, 9.2 +/- 1.0 > 7.6 +/- 2.0 > 6.7 +/- 1.5 > 5.2 +/- 1.8 mg.kg-1.min-1, P < 0.05). The incidence rate of decreased insulin sensitivity among the four groups was: HT+obesity > obesity > HT+nonobesity > NS (87.0%, 69.6%, 41.1% and 2.8%, P < 0.05). After adjusting for age, sex and BMI, M value was greater in normotensives (n = 59) than in hypertension patients (n = 105) (8.0 versus 6.6 mg.kg-1min-1, P < 0.01). Multivariates analysis showed that BMI and SBP are the two most important determinants for M value, but the effect of 1 kg/m2 BMI is equivalent to that of 20 mmHg SBP.

CONCLUSION:

Decreased insulin sensitivity may be the common linkage between obesity and hypertension. Obesity may have more pronounced effect on insulin sensitivity than hypertension.

PMID:
9275503
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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