Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2015 Oct 2;350(6256):aac5992. doi: 10.1126/science.aac5992.

Genetic determinants of in vivo fitness and diet responsiveness in multiple human gut Bacteroides.

Author information

1
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
2
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
3
Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, 92037 CA, USA. A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia.
4
A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia.
5
Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO 63167, USA.
6
Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Aix-Marseille Université 13288 Marseille cedex 9, France.
7
Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Aix-Marseille Université 13288 Marseille cedex 9, France. Department of Biological Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
8
Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, 92037 CA, USA.
9
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. jgordon@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Libraries of tens of thousands of transposon mutants generated from each of four human gut Bacteroides strains, two representing the same species, were introduced simultaneously into gnotobiotic mice together with 11 other wild-type strains to generate a 15-member artificial human gut microbiota. Mice received one of two distinct diets monotonously, or both in different ordered sequences. Quantifying the abundance of mutants in different diet contexts allowed gene-level characterization of fitness determinants, niche, stability, and resilience and yielded a prebiotic (arabinoxylan) that allowed targeted manipulation of the community. The approach described is generalizable and should be useful for defining mechanisms critical for sustaining and/or approaches for deliberately reconfiguring the highly adaptive and durable relationship between the human gut microbiota and host in ways that promote wellness.

PMID:
26430127
PMCID:
PMC4608238
DOI:
10.1126/science.aac5992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center