Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2015 Sep 10;10(9):e0137784. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0137784. eCollection 2015.

A Metagenomic Investigation of the Duodenal Microbiota Reveals Links with Obesity.

Author information

1
URMITE CNRS-IRD 198 UMR 6236, Aix Marseille Université, Faculté de Médecine, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, 13385, Marseille, France.
2
CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, UMR7282 Enzymology at Interfaces and Physiology of Lipolysis, 13009, Marseille, France.
3
Hepato-gastroenterology Department, Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, France.
4
Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université, 13288, Marseille, France; Department of Biological Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few studies have tested the small intestine microbiota in humans, where most nutrient digestion and absorption occur. Here, our objective was to examine the duodenal microbiota between obese and normal volunteers using metagenomic techniques.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We tested duodenal samples from five obese and five normal volunteers using 16S rDNA V6 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing. The predominant phyla of the duodenal microbiota were Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, whereas Bacteroidetes were absent. Obese individuals had a significant increase in anaerobic genera (p < 0.001) and a higher abundance of genes encoding Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (p = 0.0018) compared to the control group. Obese individuals also had a reduced abundance of genes encoding sucrose phosphorylase (p = 0.015) and 1,4-alpha-glucan branching enzyme (p = 0.05). Normal weight people had significantly increased FabK (p = 0.027), and the glycerophospholipid metabolism pathway revealed the presence of phospholipase A1 only in the control group (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

The duodenal microbiota of obese individuals exhibit alterations in the fatty acid and sucrose breakdown pathways, probably induced by diet imbalance.

PMID:
26356733
PMCID:
PMC4565581
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0137784
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center