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Cell. 2014 Oct 9;159(2):253-66. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.008. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

Bacteria from diverse habitats colonize and compete in the mouse gut.

Author information

1
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
2
Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314, USA.
3
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
4
Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
5
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7257, 13288 Marseille, France.
6
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7257, 13288 Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille Université, UMR 7257, 13288 Marseille, France.
7
Biofrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
8
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA. Electronic address: jgordon@wustl.edu.

Abstract

To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, soil, and estuarine microbial mats. Bacteria from these foreign environments colonized and persisted in the mouse gut; their capacity to metabolize dietary and host carbohydrates and bile acids correlated with colonization success. Cohousing mice harboring these xenomicrobiota or a mouse cecal microbiota, along with germ-free "bystanders," revealed the success of particular bacterial taxa in invading guts with established communities and empty gut habitats. Unanticipated patterns of ecological succession were observed; for example, a soil-derived bacterium dominated even in the presence of bacteria from other gut communities (zebrafish and termite), and human-derived bacteria colonized germ-free bystander mice before mouse-derived organisms. This approach can be generalized to address a variety of mechanistic questions about succession, including succession in the context of microbiota-directed therapeutics.

PMID:
25284151
PMCID:
PMC4194163
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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