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Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Jun 26;11:E109. doi: 10.5888/pcd11.130293.

Contribution of excessive alcohol consumption to deaths and years of potential life lost in the United States.

Author information

1
Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, WA 98504. Telephone: 360 236-4247. Email: mandy.stahre@doh.wa.gov.
2
New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of premature mortality in the United States. The objectives of this study were to update national estimates of alcohol-attributable deaths (AAD) and years of potential life lost (YPLL) in the United States, calculate age-adjusted rates of AAD and YPLL in states, assess the contribution of AAD and YPLL to total deaths and YPLL among working-age adults, and estimate the number of deaths and YPLL among those younger than 21 years.

METHODS:

We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Alcohol-Related Disease Impact application for 2006-2010 to estimate total AAD and YPLL across 54 conditions for the United States, by sex and age. AAD and YPLL rates and the proportion of total deaths that were attributable to excessive alcohol consumption among working-age adults (20-64 y) were calculated for the United States and for individual states.

RESULTS:

From 2006 through 2010, an annual average of 87,798 (27.9/100,000 population) AAD and 2.5 million (831.6/100,000) YPLL occurred in the United States. Age-adjusted state AAD rates ranged from 51.2/100,000 in New Mexico to 19.1/100,000 in New Jersey. Among working-age adults, 9.8% of all deaths in the United States during this period were attributable to excessive drinking, and 69% of all AAD involved working-age adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Excessive drinking accounted for 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults in the United States. AAD rates vary across states, but excessive drinking remains a leading cause of premature mortality nationwide. Strategies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force can help reduce excessive drinking and harms related to it.

PMID:
24967831
PMCID:
PMC4075492
DOI:
10.5888/pcd11.130293
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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