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Eur J Endocrinol. 2008 Feb;158(2):153-61. doi: 10.1530/EJE-07-0600.

Associations of age-dependent IGF-I SDS with cardiovascular diseases and risk conditions: cross-sectional study in 6773 primary care patients.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Dresden, 01187, Dresden, Germany. schneider@mpipsykl.mpg.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed at investigating the association of age-dependent IGF-I SDS with diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and heart diseases, in a large patient sample.

BACKGROUND:

IGF-I has been suggested to be associated with several diseases and a prognostic marker for the development of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors. The findings, though, have been inconsistent possibly due to the methodological factors.

METHODS:

We studied 6773 consecutive primary care patients, aged 18+ years, in a cross-sectional, epidemiological study in primary care, Diabetes Cardiovascular Risk-Evaluation: Targets and Essential Data for Commitment of Treatment study. All patients underwent a standardized clinical diagnostic and laboratory assessment. IGF-I levels were measured with an automated chemiluminescence assay system. We calculated the odds ratios (OR) for diseases in quintiles of IGF-I, and additionally analyzed the association of age-dependent IGF-I SDS with these conditions.

RESULTS:

After multiple adjustments for confounders, we found increased ORs for coronary artery disease in patients with high IGF-I. Women, but not men, with low IGF-I also showed increased ORs for coronary artery disease. Dyslipidemia was positively associated with IGF-I. Type 2 diabetes showed a curvilinear association with IGF-I SDS.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest the existence of multiple and complex interactions between IGF-I and several health conditions. The complex nature of disease- and subgroup-specific associations along with the methodological factors can be held responsible for divergent findings in previous studies.

PMID:
18230821
DOI:
10.1530/EJE-07-0600
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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