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Allergol Int. 2006 Sep;55(3):337-41.

Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome mimicking systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan. akmanki@md.okayama-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We report two cases of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) in patients in whom systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) had initially been diagnosed or suspected. One patient, given a diagnosis of systemic JIA, was a 10-year-old boy who had presented with recurrent episodes of spike-fever, skin rash, arthritis, and myalgia. The other patient was his 7-year-old sister, who presented with similar symptoms and was suspected of having systemic JIA.

METHODS:

Serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 1A (TNFRSF1A), TNF-alpha, Interleukin (IL) -6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in two siblings and JIA patients. In addition, DNA sequencing of the TNFRSF1A gene in two siblings was also performed.

RESULTS:

A detailed family history showed that their mother had an episode of recurrent fever, arthritis, and myalgia with an increased serum CRP after the delivery of a daughter. Both siblings had serum levels of soluble TNFRSF1A that were below the normal reference range, and that did not reach a level corresponding to that of systemic JIA. On TNFRSF1A gene analysis, a single missense mutation resulting in C30Y was found in both siblings.

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on the clinical features and the TNFRSF1A mutation, both siblings were given a diagnosis of TRAPS. The serum levels of soluble TNFRSF1A, measured along with the CRP level, may be a useful screening marker for differentiating TRAPS from systemic JIA.

PMID:
17075277
DOI:
10.2332/allergolint.55.337
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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