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Obes Res. 2003 Nov;11(11):1384-90.

Lower serum adiponectin levels in African-American boys.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, 541 North Clinical Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5111, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone with anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects, in relation to race or gender in younger subjects.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

The relationship of adiponectin, quantitated by radioimmunoassay, to anthropometric and metabolic factors (fasting insulin, glucose, and leptin) and reproductive hormones was examined in 46 healthy African Americans (25 girls/21 boys) and 40 whites (20 girls/20 boys) ranging in age from 12 to 21 years.

RESULTS:

There was no statistical difference in BMI or in BMI percentile among the four groups. Sums of skinfolds, but not skinfold percentile, were significantly lower in boys than girls (p = 0.001 and p = 0.896, respectively), whereas there was no difference between racial groups. Leptin was significantly greater in girls (p = 0.0002). There was no difference in fasting serum glucose, insulin, or homeostasis model assessment score among any of the groups. There was a significant negative univariate relationship between serum adiponectin and both BMI and BMI percentile for the entire group (p = 0.006 and p = 0.005). In a multivariate model, BMI percentile (p = 0.005) and the interaction between race and gender (p = 0.026) were significant predictors of serum adiponectin. In this model, African-American boys had the lowest serum adiponectin level, 37% less than white boys, who had the highest adiponectin levels.

DISCUSSION:

Serum adiponectin levels are reduced in young obese subjects (African Americans and whites) and are lower in African-American boys than white boys. A lower adiponectin level in African-American boys may predispose this group to a greater risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
14627760
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2003.187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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