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Forensic Sci Int. 2007 Sep 13;171(2-3):212-5. Epub 2006 Jun 12.

Allele frequencies and haplotypes of eight Y-short tandem repeats in Bantu population living in Central Africa.

Author information

1
Unité INSERM U743 (Immunologie Humaine), Centre de Recherches Biomédicales des Cordeliers, and Université René Descartes (Paris V), Paris, France.

Abstract

Eight Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385I/II) were used to assess haplotype distribution in non-selected, unrelated Bantu males living in Central Africa [N. Mathias, M. Bayes, C. Tyler-Smith, Highly informative compound haplotypes for the human Y chromosome, Hum. Mol. Genet. 3 (1994) 115-123; L. Roewer, J. Arnemann, N.K. Spurr, K.H. Grzeschik, J.T. Epplen, Simple repeat sequences on the human Y chromosome are equally polymorphic as their autosomal counterparts, Hum. Genet. 89 (1992) 389-394; P. De Knijff, M. Kayser, A. Caglia, D. Corach, N. Fretwel, C. Gehrig, G. Graziosi, F. Heidorn, S. Herrmann, B. Herzog, M. Hidding, K. Honda, M. Jobling, M. Krawczak, K. Leim, S. Meuser, E. Meyer, W. Oesterreich, A. Pandya, W. Parson, G. Penacino, A. Perez-Lezaun, A. Piccini, M. Prinz, C. Schmitt, P. M. Schneider, R. Szibor, J. Teifel-Greding, G. Weishold, L. Rower, Chromosome Y microsatellites: population genetic and evolutionary aspects, Int. J. Legal Med. 110 (1997) 134-149; M. Kayser, A. Caglia, D. Corach, N. Fretwel, C. Gehrig, G. Graziosi, F. Heidorn, S. Herrmann, B. Herzog, M. Hidding, K. Honda, M. Jobling, M. Krawczak, K. Leim, S. Meuser, E. Meyer, W. Oesterreich, A. Pandya, W. Parson, G. Penacino, A. Perez-Lezaun, A. Piccini, M. Prinz, C. Schmitt, P. M. Schneider, R. Szibor, J. Teifel-Greding, G. Weishold, P. de Knijff, L. Rower, Evaluation of Y chromosome STRs: a multicenter study, Int. J. Legal Med. 110 (1997) 125-133, 141-149]. One hundred and sixty-five full haplotypes were obtained from Bantu males. The most common haplotype (DYS19-15, DYS389I-13, DYS389II-30, DYS390-21, DYS391-10, DYS392-11, DYS393-13, DYS385I/II-15,17) was shared by 5.5% of individuals. In the Bantu population in Central Africa, the haplotype diversity and the discrimination capacity of Y-STR may be estimated at 99.14% and 0.5333, respectively.

PMID:
16769189
DOI:
10.1016/j.forsciint.2006.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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