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Items: 1 to 20 of 443

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Effect of repeated ('binge') dosing of MDMA to rats housed at normal and high temperature on neurotoxic damage to cerebral 5-HT and dopamine neurones.

Sanchez V, O'shea E, Saadat KS, Elliott JM, Colado MI, Green AR.

J Psychopharmacol. 2004 Sep;18(3):412-6.

PMID:
15358986
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Adolescent MDMA exposure diminishes the physiological and neurotoxic consequences of an MDMA binge in female rats.

Piper BJ, Henderson CS, Meyer JS.

Dev Psychobiol. 2014 Jul;56(5):924-34. doi: 10.1002/dev.21169. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

PMID:
24752593
7.

Caffeine promotes hyperthermia and serotonergic loss following co-administration of the substituted amphetamines, MDMA ("Ecstasy") and MDA ("Love").

McNamara R, Kerans A, O'Neill B, Harkin A.

Neuropharmacology. 2006 Jan;50(1):69-80. Epub 2005 Sep 26.

PMID:
16188283
10.

Development and characterization of a novel animal model of intermittent MDMA ("Ecstasy") exposure during adolescence.

Meyer JS, Piper BJ, Vancollie VE.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Oct;1139:151-63. doi: 10.1196/annals.1432.029.

PMID:
18991859
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Serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA (ecstasy) in the developing rat brain.

Meyer JS, Ali SF.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Jun;965:373-80.

PMID:
12105113
15.

Increased responsiveness to MDMA in adult rats treated neonatally with MDMA.

Piper BJ, Meyer JS.

Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2006 Jan-Feb;28(1):95-102. Epub 2005 Nov 4.

PMID:
16271852
16.

Increased effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) in a rat model of depression.

Jaehne EJ, Majumder I, Salem A, Irvine RJ.

Addict Biol. 2011 Jan;16(1):7-19. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2009.00196.x.

PMID:
20192951
18.

Association of caffeine to MDMA does not increase antinociception but potentiates adverse effects of this recreational drug.

Camarasa J, Pubill D, Escubedo E.

Brain Res. 2006 Sep 21;1111(1):72-82. Epub 2006 Aug 2.

PMID:
16889759
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