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1.
Fertil Steril. 2019 Jun;111(6):1102-1104. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.04.015.

End of anonymity: stepping into the dawn of communication and a new paradigm in gamete donor counseling.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
2.
J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Apr;35(Suppl 1):S1-S2. doi: 10.4103/joacp.JOACP_56_19.

ERAS - The dawn of a new era!

Author information

1
Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, NIMS Hospital, Hyderabad, India.
2
Anesthesiology, Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Masonic Childrens' Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
3.
Clin Neurophysiol. 2019 May 9. pii: S1388-2457(19)30852-1. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2019.05.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Immune checkpoint inhibitors and neuropathy: A new dawn.

Author information

1
Sydney Medical School Westmead, University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: steve.vucic@sydney.edu.au.
4.
Surg Oncol Clin N Am. 2019 Jul;28(3):xv-xvi. doi: 10.1016/j.soc.2019.04.002. Epub 2019 Apr 20.

The Dawn of a New Age in Cancer Immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Hugh Cabot Professor of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Rogel Cancer Center, Michigan Medicine, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5392, USA. Electronic address: aechang@umich.edu.
5.
Womens Health Issues. 2019 May - Jun;29(3):267-273. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2019.03.003. Epub 2019 May 3.

Gender Differences in Response to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Among Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn Veterans.

Author information

1
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California. Electronic address: rgobin@illinois.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention, Washington, District of Columbia.
3
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California.
4
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California; California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, Alhambra, California.
5
Executive Division, National Center for PTSD, White River Junction, Vermont; Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Most of our knowledge base regarding treatment response among veterans comes from predominantly male samples. Evidence suggests, however, that women and men use different coping strategies, which may impact how effective treatments are for people of different genders. The purpose of this investigation was to examine gender differences in response to acceptance and commitment therapy, an empirically supported transdiagnostic psychotherapy.

METHODS:

Data were drawn from a multisite, randomized, controlled trial of acceptance and commitment therapy as compared with a psychotherapy control, namely, present-centered therapy (PCT), in veterans with emotional distress who served in Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, or New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND). Although the original trial did not find a difference between acceptance and commitment therapy and present-centered therapy, we were interested in examining whether gender differences may have been obscured in the original analyses. This secondary analysis included 117 participants for whom at least one post-baseline data point was available and examined the role of gender in treatment response.

RESULTS:

Gender differences were not observed on the primary outcome of general distress, but were observed in post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (p < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

These preliminary results suggest the possibility of gender differences in psychotherapy response and should motivate additional study of gender-specific care.

6.
Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing Za Zhi. 2019 Apr 24;47(4):261-264. doi: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-3758.2019.04.002.

[Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: a new dawn seems to arrive].

[Article in Chinese; Abstract available in Chinese from the publisher]

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, General Hospital of Northern Theater Command, Shenyang 110016, China.

Abstract

7.
J Hepatol. 2019 Jul;71(1):5-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2019.03.010. Epub 2019 May 2.

The dawn of a new EASL - A new chapter in the history of the European Association for the Study of the liver.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Medicine and Division of Surgery, Inflammatory Diseases and Transplantation, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: t.h.karlsen@medisin.uio.no.
2
Centre for Liver Research, Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research, Liver Biomedical Research Unit at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom; Liver Unit, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
8.
Transplantation. 2019 Apr 22. doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000002772. [Epub ahead of print]

Ex Situ Liver Machine Perfusion As An Emerging Graft Protective Strategy In Clinical Liver Transplantation: The Dawn of A New Era.

Abstract

The disparity between the number of available donor livers and patients awaiting a liver transplant has led transplant centers to accept suboptimal livers. There has been no universally accepted tool to predict the post-transplant function of these organs to safely increase the donor pool, protect these livers against ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) or improve their quality before implantation. Ex situ liver machine preservation has emerged as a promising novel graft protective strategy in the field of liver transplantation with remarkable ongoing research and evolving clinical trials within Europe and the US. This technology has been shown to be safe and feasible in the clinical liver transplantation field, has shown to reduce liver IRI, and to decrease the graft discard rate compared to conventional static cold storage (SCS). This review focuses on the current status of ex situ machine preservation in clinical liver transplantation, describing the most important technical aspects with the emphasis on the findings of the most recent clinical studies.

9.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2019 Mar 28;10:185. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2019.00185. eCollection 2019.

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Endocrinology and Metabolism: The Dawn of a New Era.

Author information

1
Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States.
2
Centre de Recherche, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.
3
Département de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.
4
Medicover GmbH, Berlin, Germany.
5
Department of Medicine, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany.
6
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, United States.
7
Section on Endocrinology and Genetics, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States.

KEYWORDS:

artificial intelligence; diabetes; endocrinology; machine learning; metabolism; thyroid

10.
Comput Sci Eng. 2018 Sep-Oct;20(5):18-25. doi: 10.1109/MCSE.2018.05329812. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Exascale Computing: A New Dawn for Computational Biology.

Author information

1
University of California San Diego.

Abstract

As biologists discover and learn to embrace the complexity of biological systems, computational data analysis and modeling have become critical for furthering our understanding. Exascale computing will enable the development of new predictive multiscale models, transforming how we study the behaviors of organisms and ecosystems, ultimately leading to new innovations and discoveries.

PMID:
30983889
PMCID:
PMC6458592
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1109/MCSE.2018.05329812
11.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019 Apr;49(7):952. doi: 10.1111/apt.15093.

Editorial: shining a light on cholangiocarcinoma-a new dawn for photodynamic therapy?

Author information

1
Clinical Department of Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh, Edinburg, UK.
PMID:
30868632
DOI:
10.1111/apt.15093
Icon for Wiley
12.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019 Apr;49(7):953-954. doi: 10.1111/apt.15134.

Editorial: shining a light on cholangiocarcinoma-a new dawn for photodynamic therapy? Authors' reply.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
PMID:
30868630
DOI:
10.1111/apt.15134
Icon for Wiley
13.
Oncotarget. 2019 Jan 18;10(6):626-628. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.26595. eCollection 2019 Jan 18.

The dawn of a new era in treating T-PLL.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Lymphocyte Signaling and Oncoproteome, Department of Internal Medicine I, Center for Integrated Oncology Köln-Bonn, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Excellence Cluster for Cellular Stress Response and Aging-Associated Diseases and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

ATM; BCL2 antagonists; HDAC inhibition; T-PLL; p53 reactivation

14.
Proteomics Clin Appl. 2019 Mar;13(2):e1800087. doi: 10.1002/prca.201800087. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Proteomics in Drug Development: The Dawn of a New Era?

Author information

1
Mosaiques Diagnostics GmbH, Rotenburger Straße 20, D-30659, Hannover, Germany.
2
BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, G12 8TA, Glasgow, UK.

Abstract

Mass spectrometry offers the potential of acquiring high resolution data depicting the functional status of a group of healthy or diseased individuals, according to different conditions. As most of the drugs are currently targeting proteins, proteomics has a dual value, both in the discovery of new molecules as therapeutic targets, but also as a methodology to perform high throughput drug profiling. As there is an evident need for drugs to be improved in terms of efficacy, a mechanistic insight for downstream effectors can be valuable in order to predict side effects and resistance mechanisms. Recently developed assays, like thermal proteome profiling enables comprehensive drug target profiling and is, therefore, of high value in drug discovery. In this review, a systematic literature search is conducted and the most prominent proteomics studies as implicated in assisting drug discovery and development is presented. Focus is placed on investigations that are closer to implementation, therefore particular emphasis is given in studies conducted in human diseased population and further verified in vitro or in vivo.

KEYWORDS:

drug discovery; mass spectrometry; proteomics

PMID:
30724014
DOI:
10.1002/prca.201800087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Wiley
15.
Lancet Respir Med. 2019 Mar;7(3):188-189. doi: 10.1016/S2213-2600(18)30456-9. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

A new dawn: inhaled antibiotics for patients with bronchiectasis.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; Departments of Infectious Diseases and Paediatrics, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.
2
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Queensland Children's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia; Centre for Children's Health Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia. Electronic address: anne.chang@menzies.edu.au.
16.
J Ren Nutr. 2019 Jan;29(1):1. doi: 10.1053/j.jrn.2018.11.003.

Opportunities for Renal Nutrition and Metabolism at the Dawn of 2020s: An Inauguration Message From the New JREN Editors-In-Chief.

Author information

1
Council on Renal Nutrition. Electronic address: LWMoore@houstonmethodist.org.
2
International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism.
17.
Blood Rev. 2019 Mar;34:67-83. doi: 10.1016/j.blre.2018.12.001. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes: The dawn of a new era?

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Hematology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Section of Hematologic Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Hematology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: amer.zeidan@yale.edu.

Abstract

Immunotherapy has revolutionized therapy in both solid and liquid malignancies. The ability to cure acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is proof of concept for the application of immunotherapy in AML and MDS. However, outside of HSCT, only the anti-CD33 antibody drug conjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin is currently approved as an antibody-targeted therapy for AML. Several avenues of immunotherapeutic drugs are currently in different stages of clinical development. Here, we review recent advances in antibody-based therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, vaccines and adoptive cell-based therapy for patients with AML and MDS. First, we discuss different antibody constructs. Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and CD47 as well as peptide, dendritic cell and dendritic/AML cell-based vaccines are reviewed next. Lastly, adoptive cell-based therapy including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell and NK cell therapy is discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myelogenous leukemia; adoptive cell therapy; antibody; immunotherapy; myelodysplastic syndrome; vaccine

PMID:
30553527
DOI:
10.1016/j.blre.2018.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
18.
Sports Biomech. 2018 Dec 12:1-9. doi: 10.1080/14763141.2018.1535619. [Epub ahead of print]

Quantifying hitting activity in tennis with racket sensors: new dawn or false dawn?

Author information

1
a Game Development , AFL Northern Territory , Darwin , Australia.
2
b Game Insight Group , Tennis Australia , Melbourne , Australia.

Abstract

The non-invasive measurement of movement through sensor technologies is common in elite sport, yet only recently become possible in tennis. This study validated two commercial tennis racquet sensors compared to gold standards in VICON and expert notational analysis. One national-level male tennis player hit 24 shots (9 forehands and 9 backhands, hit with heavy topspin, flat and slice; 6 serves) using a Babolat Play racket with a Zepp sensor. Measures of shot type, impact location and racket speed were compared against those captured by a 500-Hz 12 camera VICON system. Cohen's kappa (κ) and a weighted kappa (κw) assessed the accuracy of stroke classification and impact location, respectively, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) validated sensor-derived racket speed. Both sensors recorded the same total stroke volume as VICON, while Zepp racket speed displayed near perfect agreement with VICON (ICC = 0.983; p < 0.001). They exhibited moderate agreement with true stroke classification (Babolat: κ = 0.730; Zepp: κ = 0.612) and minimal agreement with true impact location (Babolat: κw = 0.412; Zepp: κw = 0.217). During match play, both sensors achieved near perfect accuracy for stroke volume but experienced difficulty discriminating the different stroke types. In sum, the Babolat Play and Zepp determined stroke volume and intensity accurately but were less effective in identifying specific strokes and impact locations.

KEYWORDS:

Inertial measurement; racket sports; technology

19.
Radiology. 2019 Mar;290(3):657-658. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2018182573. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

The Dawn of a New Era in Low-Dose PET Imaging.

Author information

1
From the Department of Radiology, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, A.A. Martinos Center, 149 13th St, Room 2.301, Charlestown, MA 02129.
20.
Eur Respir J. 2018 Nov 29;52(5). pii: 1801671. doi: 10.1183/13993003.01671-2018. Print 2018 Nov.

The Severe Heterogeneous Asthma Research collaboration, Patient-centred (SHARP) ERS Clinical Research Collaboration: a new dawn in asthma research.

Author information

1
NIHR Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University Southampton, Southampton, UK.
2
National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, London, UK.
3
Health Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Amsterdam University Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Personalized Medicine Clinic, Asthma and Allergy, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan, Italy and SANI-Severe Asthma Network Italy.
6
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA.
7
Airway Disease, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK.
8
Institute for Health Research Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit and Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
9
European Respiratory Society, Lausanne, Switzerland.
10
European Lung Foundation, Sheffield, UK.
11
Asthma UK, London, UK.
12
Dutch Lung Foundation, Amersfoort, The Netherlands.
13
EUPATI, Brussels, Belgium.
14
Atini, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
15
Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU), Liege University, Liege, Belgium.
16
Universitätsmedizin Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
17
Chiesi Farmaceutici, Global Clinical Development, Parma, Italy.
18
Respiratory Medical Franchise, GSK, Brentford, UK.
19
TEVA Pharmaceuticals, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
20
BioSci Consulting, Maasmechelen, Belgium.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest: R. Djukanovic reports receiving fees for lectures at symposia organised by Novartis, AstraZeneca and TEVA, consultation for TEVA and Novartis as member of advisory boards, and participation in a scientific discussion about asthma organised by GlaxoSmithKline. He is a co-founder and current consultant, and has shares in Synairgen, a University of Southampton spin out company. Conflict of interest: I.M. Adcock has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: G. Anderson reports grants from Pieris Pharmaceuticals (research grant on inhaled anticalins), personal fees from Pieris Pharmaceuticals (consultancy on inhaled anticalins), other from AstraZeneca (during 2016 he worked on secondment from his university as a visiting chief scientist), personal fees from ENA (consultancy on TLR2 agonists), personal fees from AstraZeneca/Medimmune (consultancy on respiratory franchise and involvement in Novelty clinical trial), personal fees from Orbimed (consultancy on respiratory projects), personal fees from Novartis (consultancy on respiratory portfolio), personal fees from Menarini (speakers’ fee), grants from GSK (untied grant to the University of Melbourne), and personal fees from GSK (advisory board), outside the submitted work. In addition, G. Anderson has a patent for a method of treatment licensed to GSK. Conflict of interest: E.H. Bel reports grants for research and/or personal fees from GSK, Novartis, AstraZeneca, Teva, Sanofi Regeneron, Vectura, Boehringer, and Roche. Conflict of interest: G.W. Canonica has received personal fees from AstraZeneca, Sanofi, Regeneron, Novartis, Boehringer Ingelheim, Chiesi Farmaceutici, Mundipharma, Orion and Menarini, and research grants from AstraZeneca, Novartis, GSK, Sanofi Regeneron. Conflict of interest: H. Cao has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: K.F. Chung reports grants and personal fees from GlaxoSmithKline (advisory board meeting), personal fees from AstraZeneca (advisory board meeting and speakers’ bureau), personal fees from Novartis (advisory board meeting and speakers’ bureau), grants and personal fees from Merck (speakers’ bureau), personal fees from Boehringer Ingelheim (advisory board meeting), and personal fees from TEVA (advisory board meeting), outside the submitted work. Conflict of interest: D.E. Davies reports personal fees from Synairgen (consultant and shareholder), outside the submitted work. In addition, D.E. Davies has a patent “Interferon beta for virus-induced asthma exacerbations” licensed to Synairgen. Conflict of interest: C. Genton is an employee of the European Respiratory Society. In addition, C. Genton reports multi-sponsored study fees from Chiesi, Sanofi, Grifols, Novartis, Insmed, Zambon, TEVA and GlaxoSmithKline outside the submitted work. Conflict of interest: T. Gibson-Latimer reports that she is a lay reviewer and lay panel member for Asthma UK. Conflict of interest: D. Hamerlijnck is an Independent European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients’ Associations (EFA) patient expert for Novartis Global Drug Development Chief Medical Office. Conflict of interest: E. Heuvelin is an employee of the European Respiratory Society. In addition, E. Heuvelin reports multi-sponsored study fees from Chiesi, Sanofi, Grifols, Novartis, Insmed, Zambon, TEVA and GlaxoSmithKline outside the submitted work. Conflict of interest: R. Louis reports grants from GSK, Novartis and Chiesi, and grants and personal fees from AstraZeneca, outside the submitted work. Conflict of interest: S. Korn has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: M. Kots reports personal fees from Chiesi Farmaceutici (company employee; Global clinical development department), outside the submitted work. Conflict of interest: N. Kwon has nothing to disclose. Conflict of interest: R. Naddaf is a TEVA Pharmaceuticals Netherlands employee. Conflict of interest: S.S. Wagers reports consulting fees from Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Academic Medical Research AMC, Medical Research BV Asthma UK, Athens Medical School, Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbH, CHU de Toulouse, CIRO, DS Biologicls Ltd, École Polytechnique Fédérele de Lausanne, European Respiratory Society, FISEVI, Fluidic Analytics Ltd., Fraunhofer IGB, Fraunhofer ITEM, GlaxosmithKline Research & Dev Ltd, Holland & Knight, Karolinska Institutet Fakturor, KU Leuven Longfonds, National Heart & Lung Institute, Novartis Pharma AG, Owlstone Medical Limited, PExA AB, UCB Biopharma S.P.R.L., UCB Biosciences GmbH, Umeå University, Univ. Hosptial Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Universita Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Universität Ulm, University of Bern, University of Edinburgh, University of Hull, University of Leicester, University of Loughborough, University of Luxembourg, University of Manchester, University of Notthingham, Vlaams Brabant, Dienst Europa.

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