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Burns. 2014 Dec;40(8):1650-60. doi: 10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.008. Epub 2014 Apr 30.

Development of a new nanofiber scaffold for use with stem cells in a third degree burn animal model.

Author information

1
Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Post Graduate Program in Physiology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address: dani_ste@hotmail.com.
2
Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
3
Department of Morphological Science, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
4
Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Post Graduate Program in Physiology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
5
Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande, Brazil.
6
Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Post Graduate Program in Physiology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Stem Cell Research Institute, Brazil.

Abstract

The combination of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and nanotechnology to promote tissue engineering presents a strategy for the creation of new substitutes for tissues. Aiming at the utilization of the scaffolds of poly-d,l-lactic acid (PDLLA) associated or not with Spirulina biomass (PDLLA/Sp) in skin wounds, MSCs were seeded onto nanofibers produced by electrospinning. These matrices were evaluated for morphology and fiber diameter by scanning electron microscopy and their interaction with the MSCs by confocal microscopy analysis. The biomaterials were implanted in mice with burn imitating skin defects for up to 7 days and five groups were studied for healing characteristics. The scaffolds demonstrated fibrous and porous structures and, when implanted in the animals, they tolerated mechanical stress for up to two weeks. Seven days after the induction of lesions, a similar presence of ulceration, inflammation and fibrosis among all the treatments was observed. No group showed signs of re-epithelization, keratinization or presence of hair follicles on the lesion site. In conclusion, although there was no microscopical difference among all the groups, it is possible that more prolonged analysis would show different results. Moreover, the macroscopic analysis of the groups with the scaffolds showed better cicatrization in comparison with the control group.

KEYWORDS:

Burn model; Electrospinning; Spirulina; Stem cells

PMID:
24794225
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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