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1.
Int J Pharm. 2019 Oct 31:118813. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2019.118813. [Epub ahead of print]

Nasal route for vaccine and drug delivery: Features and current opportunities.

Author information

1
Head of Mucosal Immunology Project, Vaccine Division, Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, P.O. Box 6162, Havana 10600, Cuba. Electronic address: yadira.lobaina@cigb.edu.cu.

Abstract

Mucosal administration, and specifically nasal route, constitutes an alternative and promising strategy for drug and vaccine delivery. Mucosal routes have several advantages supporting their selective use for different pathologies. Currently, many efforts are being made to develop effective drug formulations and novel devices for nasal delivery. This review described the structure and main characteristics of the nasal cavity. The advantages, achievements and challenges of the nasal route use for medical purposes are discussed, with particular focus on vaccine delivery. Compelling evidences support the potentialities and safety of the nasal delivery of vaccines and drugs. This alternative route could become a solution for many unmet medical issues and also may facilitate and cheapen massive immunization campaigns or long-lasting chronic treatments. Nowadays, in spite of certain remaining skepticism, the field of nasal delivery of drugs and vaccines is growing fast, bolstered by current developments in nanotechnology, imaging and administration devices. A notable increase in the number of approved drugs for nasal administration is envisaged.

KEYWORDS:

Drug delivery; Mucosal administration; Nasal delivery; Nasal route; Vaccines

Publication type

Publication type

3.
Drug Discov Today. 2019 Aug;24(8):1679-1684. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2019.05.035. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Challenges and opportunities for drug delivery to the posterior of the eye.

Author information

1
Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
2
Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: crystal.shin@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye remains challenging even though the eye is readily accessible. Its unique and complex anatomy and physiology contribute to the limited options for drug delivery via non-invasive topical treatment, which is the prevalent ophthalmic treatment. To treat the most common retinal diseases, intravitreal (IVT) injection has been a common and effective therapy. With the advancement of nanotechnologies, novel formulations and drug delivery systems are being developed to treat posterior segment diseases. Here, we discuss the recent advancement in ocular delivery systems, including-sustained release formulations, IVT implants, and preclinical topical formulations, and the challenges faced in their clinical translation.

PMID:
31175955
PMCID:
PMC6708448
[Available on 2020-08-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.drudis.2019.05.035
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4.
Drug Deliv Transl Res. 2019 Dec;9(6):1067-1081. doi: 10.1007/s13346-019-00650-1.

Recent advances in cyclosporine drug delivery: challenges and opportunities.

Author information

1
Shobhaben Pratapbhai Patel School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, SVKM's NMIMS, V.L. Mehta Road, Vile Parle (W), Mumbai, 400056, India.
2
Shobhaben Pratapbhai Patel School of Pharmacy & Technology Management, SVKM's NMIMS, V.L. Mehta Road, Vile Parle (W), Mumbai, 400056, India. sarikawairkar@gmail.com.

Abstract

Cyclosporine has been established as a gold standard for its immunosuppressant action. Apart from this, the molecule is boon in treating broad spectrum of diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and dry eye syndrome. The broad spectrum of cyclosporine demands efficient delivery systems by several routes. Neoral® and Sandimmune® are currently available formulations for oral route, whereas Restasis® is used for ocular delivery of cyclosporine. The available formulations serve the purpose only to a limited extent due to constraints like high molecular weight, low solubility, low permeability, bitter taste, and narrow therapeutic index of cyclosporine. Therefore, several novel formulations like microemulsion, self-emulsifying systems, nanoparticles, and microspheres were developed to overcome these constraints, exploring different routes like oral, ocular, and topical for cyclosporine. Additionally, iontophoresis and ultrasound-mediated delivery has also been studied to improve its poor permeability in topical delivery, whereas biodegradable implants were reported to increase the retention time in cornea and prolonged the release of cyclosporine by ocular route. Although these recent advances in cyclosporine delivery look promising, its clinical translation require in depth studies to deliver safe, efficacious, and stable formulation of cyclosporine. This review focuses on challenges of cyclosporine delivery and the recent advancements for overcoming the constraints.

KEYWORDS:

Advanced delivery; Cyclosporine; Delivery constraints; Routes of administration

Publication type

Publication type

5.
Eur J Pharm Biopharm. 2019 Aug;141:58-69. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpb.2019.05.004. Epub 2019 May 9.

Niclosamide repositioning for treating cancer: Challenges and nano-based drug delivery opportunities.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
2
Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: gabriel.araujo@usp.br.

Abstract

Drug repositioning may be defined as a process when new biological effects for known drugs are identified, leading to recommendations for new therapeutic applications. Niclosamide, present in the Model List of Essential Medicines, from the World Health Organization, has been used since the 1960s for tapeworm infection. Several preclinical studies have been shown its impressive anticancer effects, which led to clinical trials for colon and prostate cancer. Despite high expectations, proof of efficacy and safety are still required, which are associated with diverse biopharmaceutical challenges, such as the physicochemical properties of the drug and its oral absorption, and their relationship with clinical outcomes. Nanostructured systems are innovative drug delivery strategies, which may provide interesting pharmaceutical advantages for this candidate. The aim of this review is to discuss challenges involving niclosamide repositioning for cancer diseases, and the opportunities of therapeutic benefits from nanosctrutured system formulations containing this compound.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Clinical trials; Nanostructured systems; Niclosamide; Physicochemical properties; Repositioning

PMID:
31078739
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpb.2019.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
6.
J Exp Med. 2019 May 6;216(5):1005-1009. doi: 10.1084/jem.20190609. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

Microbial therapeutics: New opportunities for drug delivery.

Author information

1
David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
2
David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA rlanger@mit.edu.
3
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
4
Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA ctraverso@bwh.harvard.edu.
6
Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

With >40 clinical trials underway, we are nearing the first FDA-approved live microbial therapeutic. Here, Giovanni Traverso, MIT and Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor, and colleagues Miguel Jimenez and Institute Professor Robert Langer from MIT discuss the significant challenges of administering live microorganisms to patients and the opportunities for drug delivery of these new complex therapeutics.

7.
Artif Cells Nanomed Biotechnol. 2019 Dec;47(1):1312-1320. doi: 10.1080/21691401.2019.1573182.

Nanoparticle-based drug delivery in the inner ear: current challenges, limitations and opportunities.

Author information

1
a Department of Otolaryngology, Hearing Research Laboratory , University of Miami Miller School of Medicine , Miami , FL, USA.
2
b Department of Neurological Surgery , University of Miami Miller School of Medicine , Miami , FL, USA.

Abstract

Hearing loss is the most common neurosensory impairment worldwide. While conductive hearing loss can be managed by surgery, the management of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), related to the damage of sensory cells of the inner ear is more challenging to manage medically. Many causes of SNHL such as sudden idiopathic SNHL, Meniere's disease, noise-induced hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss or hearing loss from exposure to ototoxic substances can benefit from delivery of otoprotective drugs to the inner ear. However, systemic drug delivery through oral, intravenous and intramuscular methods leads to undesirable side effects due to the inner ear's limited blood supply and the relatively poor penetration of the blood-inner ear barrier (BLB). Therefore, there has been an increased interest for the targeted drug delivery to the inner ear using nanoparticles. Drug delivery through nanoparticles offers several advantages including drug stabilization for controlled release and surface modification for specific targeting. Understanding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles with cochlea and developing novel non-invasive delivery methods will promote the translation of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery for auditory disorders from bench to bedside.

KEYWORDS:

Nanoparticles; drug delivery; hearing loss; inner ear

PMID:
30987439
DOI:
10.1080/21691401.2019.1573182
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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8.
Curr Pharm Des. 2019;25(4):455-466. doi: 10.2174/1381612825666190404121507.

Limitations and Opportunities in Topical Drug Delivery: Interaction Between Silica Nanoparticles and Skin Barrier.

Author information

1
Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnologia Farmaceuticas, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile.

Abstract

The first limiting barrier for the transport in the skin is the stratum corneum; different strategies have been developed to overcome this barrier, including chemical enhancers. However, these penetration enhancers have limitations, including toxic adverse effects. In this context, research into nanomaterials has provided new tools to increase the residence time of drugs by generating a reservoir, increasing the specificity of drugs and reducing their adverse effects, and improving the penetration of drugs that are difficult to formulate. Silica nanoparticles have been proposed as suitable nanocarriers for skin delivery. Unfortunately, the mechanisms involved in the interaction, transport and fate of silica nanoparticles in the skin have not been fully investigated. This paper reviews significant findings about the interaction between silica-based nanocarriers and the skin. First, this review focuses on the properties and functions of the skin, the skin penetration properties of silica nanoparticles, their synthesis strategies and their toxicity. Finally, advances and evidence on the application of silica nanocarriers in skin drug delivery are provided, in which the use of nanoparticles increases the stability and solubility of the bioactive compound, enhancing its performance, act as penetrator enhancer and improving controlled release. Thus, improving the treatment of some skin disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Silica nanoparticles; nanocarriers; nanomedicines; skin delivery; skin disorders; topical delivery.

9.
Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2019 Aug;148:146-180. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2019.02.008. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Nanoformulation properties, characterization, and behavior in complex biological matrices: Challenges and opportunities for brain-targeted drug delivery applications and enhanced translational potential.

Author information

1
Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy, Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA, USA.
2
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; International Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering, College of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; International Ph.D. Program in Cell Therapy and Regeneration Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: thierry@tmu.edu.tw.
4
CONRAD, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Arlington, VA, USA. Electronic address: vagrahari@conrad.org.

Abstract

Nanocarriers (synthetic/cell-based have attracted enormous interest for various therapeutic indications, including neurodegenerative disorders. A broader understanding of the impact of nanomedicines design is now required to enhance their translational potential. Nanoformulations in vivo journey is significantly affected by their physicochemical properties including the size, shape, hydrophobicity, elasticity, and surface charge/chemistry/morphology, which play a role as an interface with the biological environment. Understanding protein corona formation is crucial in characterizing nanocarriers and evaluating their interactions with biological systems. In this review, the types and properties of the brain-targeted nanocarriers are discussed. The biological factors and nanocarriers properties affecting their in vivo behavior are elaborated. The compositional description of cell culture and biological matrices, including proteins potentially relevant to protein corona built-up on nanoformulation especially for brain administration, is provided. Analytical techniques of characterizing nanocarriers in complex matrices, their advantages, limitations, and implementation challenges in industrial GMP environment are discussed. The uses of orthogonal complementary characterization approaches of nanocarriers are also covered.

KEYWORDS:

Biological proteins; Blood-brain barrier; Cell-based nanocarriers, Neurodegenerative disorders; Cell-culture media; Characterization methods; Nanoparticles; Physicochemical properties; Protein-corona

Publication type

Publication type

10.
Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2019 Feb;16(2):153-162. doi: 10.1080/17425247.2019.1572111. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Development challenges and opportunities in aerosol drug delivery systems in non-invasive ventilation in adults.

Author information

1
a Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique (IREC), Pôle de Pneumologie, ORL & Dermatologie , Université Catholique de Louvain , Bruxelles , Belgium.
2
b Service de Pneumologie , Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc , Bruxelles , Belgium.
3
c Filière Physiothérapie , School of Health Sciences (HESAV), HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland , Lausanne , Switzerland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

With the gain in popularity of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), particularly in patients requiring drug delivery by aerosol therapy, the feasibility of the combination between NIV and aerosol therapy has regularly been questioned.

AREAS COVERED:

This review covers the in vitro and in vivo studies which explored the effects of this combination on pulmonary drug delivery (imaging and pharmacological studies) and on physiological measurements

EXPERT OPINION:

Even if the feasibility of the combination is evident, the type of nebulizer influences the lung deposition with a greater delivery with vibrating mesh nebulizers. The influence of the interfaces of NIV devices should be further investigated even if vented masks may seem less efficient for nebulization. There is also a need to develop new devices and modalities, or specific components better designed for a more efficient delivery, to offer more optimal particles size to lung delivery. The use of spacer also seems promising to improve the lung delivery even if strong evidences are still missing. Finally, it would be interesting to explore the influence of all spontaneous modes which use different flow-time curves. Further investigations should focus on the synchronization of the delivery with the inspiratory part of the respiratory cycle in patients during NIV, particularly when delivering toxic or expensive drugs.

KEYWORDS:

Non-invasive ventilation; aerosol; drug delivery; nebulizer

PMID:
30658045
DOI:
10.1080/17425247.2019.1572111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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11.
Pharmaceutics. 2019 Jan 15;11(1). pii: E31. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics11010031.

Protein Corona Fingerprints of Liposomes: New Opportunities for Targeted Drug Delivery and Early Detection in Pancreatic Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy. sara.palchetti@uniroma1.it.
2
Department of General Surgery, University Campus-Biomedico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome, Italy. d.caputo@unicampus.it.
3
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy. luca.digiacomo@uniroma1.it.
4
Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy. annalaura.capriotti@uniroma1.it.
5
Department of General Surgery, University Campus-Biomedico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome, Italy. r.coppola@unicampus.it.
6
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy. daniela.pozzi@uniroma1.it.
7
Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri, Istituto Regina Elena, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00144 Rome, Italy. daniela.pozzi@uniroma1.it.
8
Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy. giulio.caracciolo@uniroma1.it.

Abstract

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth cause of cancer-related mortality in the Western world and is envisaged to become the second cause by 2030. Although our knowledge about the molecular biology of PDAC is continuously increasing, this progress has not been translated into better patients' outcome. Liposomes have been used to circumvent concerns associated with the low efficiency of anticancer drugs such as severe side effects and damage of healthy tissues, but they have not resulted in improved efficacy as yet. Recently, the concept is emerging that the limited success of liposomal drugs in clinical practice is due to our poor knowledge of the nano⁻bio interactions experienced by liposomes in vivo. After systemic administration, lipid vesicles are covered by plasma proteins forming a biomolecular coating, referred to as the protein corona (PC). Recent studies have clarified that just a minor fraction of the hundreds of bound plasma proteins, referred to as "PC fingerprints" (PCFs), enhance liposome association with cancer cells, triggering efficient particle internalization. In this study, we synthesized a library of 10 liposomal formulations with systematic changes in lipid composition and exposed them to human plasma (HP). Size, zeta-potential, and corona composition of the resulting liposome⁻protein complexes were thoroughly characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), micro-electrophoresis, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC MS/MS). According to the recent literature, enrichment in PCFs was used to predict the targeting ability of synthesized liposomal formulations. Here we show that the predicted targeting capability of liposome⁻protein complexes clearly correlate with cellular uptake in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PANC-1) and insulinoma (INS-1) cells as quantified by flow-assisted cell sorting (FACS). Of note, cellular uptake of the liposomal formulation with the highest abundance of PCFs was much larger than that of Onivyde®, an Irinotecan liposomal drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2015 for the treatment of metastatic PDAC. Given the urgent need of efficient nanocarriers for the treatment of PDAC, we envision that our results will pave the way for the development of more efficient PC-based targeted nanomaterials. Here we also show that some BCs are enriched with plasma proteins that are associated with the onset and progression of PDAC (e.g., sex hormone-binding globulin, Ficolin-3, plasma protease C1 inhibitor, etc.). This could open the intriguing possibility to identify novel biomarkers.

KEYWORDS:

liposomes; pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma; protein corona

12.
Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2018 Oct;135:1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2018.11.002.

Editorial: Drug delivery in older people - unique challenges and important opportunities.

Author information

1
Sydney Pharmacy School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence on Medicines and Ageing.
2
Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Centre for Education and Research on Aging and Anzac Research Institute, Concord Hospital and University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
PMID:
30466511
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2018.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Icon for Elsevier Science
13.
Pharm Res. 2018 Nov 7;36(1):4. doi: 10.1007/s11095-018-2531-1.

An Overview of 3D Printing Technologies for Soft Materials and Potential Opportunities for Lipid-based Drug Delivery Systems.

Author information

1
Drug Delivery, Disposition and Dynamics, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia.
2
FabRx Ltd., 3 Romney Road, Ashford, Kent, TN24 0RW, UK.
3
Gattefossé SAS, 36 Chemin de Genas, 69804, Saint-Priest, France.
4
UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX, UK.
5
Drug Delivery, Disposition and Dynamics, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia. ben.boyd@monash.edu.
6
ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia. ben.boyd@monash.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a rapidly growing additive manufacturing process and it is predicted that the technology will transform the production of goods across numerous fields. In the pharmaceutical sector, 3DP has been used to develop complex dosage forms of different sizes and structures, dose variations, dose combinations and release characteristics, not possible to produce using traditional manufacturing methods. However, the technology has mainly been focused on polymer-based systems and currently, limited information is available about the potential opportunities for the 3DP of soft materials such as lipids.

METHODS:

This review paper emphasises the most commonly used 3DP technologies for soft materials such as inkjet printing, binder jetting, selective laser sintering (SLS), stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM) and semi-solid extrusion, with the current status of these technologies for soft materials in biological, food and pharmaceutical applications.

RESULT:

The advantages of 3DP, particularly in the pharmaceutical field, are highlighted and an insight is provided about the current studies for lipid-based drug delivery systems evaluating the potential of 3DP to fabricate innovative products. Additionally, the challenges of the 3DP technologies associated with technical processing, regulatory and material issues of lipids are discussed in detail.

CONCLUSION:

The future utility of 3DP for printing soft materials, particularly for lipid-based drug delivery systems, offers great advantages and the technology will potentially support patient compliance and drug effectiveness via a personalised medicine approach.

KEYWORDS:

3D printed drug products; additive manufacturing; lipid-based drug delivery systems; personalised medicines; printing pharmaceuticals; soft materials

PMID:
30406349
DOI:
10.1007/s11095-018-2531-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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14.
Pancreas. 2018 Nov/Dec;47(10):1180-1184. doi: 10.1097/MPA.0000000000001176.

Accelerating the Drug Delivery Pipeline for Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis-Knowledge Gaps and Research Opportunities: Overview Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Workshop.

Author information

1
Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health.
2
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell School of Medicine, New York, NY.
4
Department of Medicine II, Ludwig Maxmilian University and Polyklinik, Munich, Germany.
5
Royal Liverpool University Hospital and Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
6
Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.

Abstract

A workshop was sponsored by the Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, on July 25, 2018, in Pittsburgh, Penn. The workshop was designed to bring together a multidisciplinary group of experts to accelerate the development of therapeutics for clinical application in inflammatory diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Three separate working groups (acute pancreatitis, recurrent acute pancreatitis, and chronic pancreatitis) were formed to address the needs, gaps, and opportunities. The working groups included patients with pancreatic diseases, pharmaceutical company leaders, basic scientists, clinical researchers, and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration to assist with regulatory considerations and to identify the unmet needs, research targets, and opportunities to provide direction for successful development of therapeutic agents in these diseases. This article represents the summary of the overview presentations at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases workshop including an ongoing drug trial in acute pancreatitis; a successful drug development network developed by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; and considerations for subject selection in drug trials, incorporating Food and Drug Administration guidelines on clinical trial design and clinical outcome measures. The summaries of each working group follow separately in accompanying articles.

PMID:
30325855
PMCID:
PMC6201320
DOI:
10.1097/MPA.0000000000001176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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15.
Curr Cancer Drug Targets. 2019;19(4):257-276. doi: 10.2174/1568009618666180628160211.

Challenges and Opportunities from Basic Cancer Biology for Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery.

Author information

1
Cancer Metastasis Alert and Prevention Center, and Pharmaceutical Photocatalysis of State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry; Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Cancer Metastasis Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350116, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Effective cancer therapy is still a great challenge for modern medical research due to the complex underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis and tumor metastasis, and the limitations commonly associated with currently used cancer therapeutic options. Nanotechnology has been implemented in cancer therapeutics with immense potential for improving cancer treatment.

OBJECTIVE:

Through information about the recent advances regarding cancer hallmarks, we could comprehensively understand the pharmacological effects and explore the mechanisms of the interaction between the nanomaterials, which could provide opportunities to develop mechanism-based nanomedicine to treat human cancers.

METHODS:

We collected related information and data from articles.

RESULTS:

In this review, we discussed the characteristics of cancer including tumor angiogenesis, abnormalities in tumor blood vessels, uncontrolled cell proliferation markers, multidrug resistance, tumor metastasis, cancer cell metabolism, and tumor immune system that provide opportunities and challenges for nanomedicine to be directed to specific cancer cells and portray the progress that has been accomplished in application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment.

CONCLUSION:

The information presented in this review can provide useful references for further studies on developing effective nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Nanotechnology; cancer characteristics; cancer therapy; nanomedicine; tumor angiogenesis.

16.
J Drug Target. 2018 Sep;26(8):658-669. doi: 10.1080/1061186X.2017.1419356. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

Local drug delivery in the urinary tract: current challenges and opportunities.

Author information

1
a Department of Otolaryngology , University of Miami Miller School of Medicine , Miami , FL , USA.
2
b Department of Microbiology , Panjab University , Chandigarh , India.

Abstract

Drug delivery is an important consideration in disease treatment. There are many opportunities for novel methods and technologies to hold promising roles in overcoming traditional obstacles. Delivery systems functionalised to boast synergistic antimicrobial effects, specific targeting, and enhanced bioavailability allow for improved therapeutic potential and better patient outcomes. Many of these delivery modalities find clinical practicality in the field of urology, specifically in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and offer advantages over conventional methods. The aim of this review article is to discuss the current modalities of treatment for UTIs and the recent technological advancements for optimising drug delivery. We focus on challenges that persist in drug delivery during UTIs including barriers to antimicrobial penetration, drug resistance, biofilm formation and specific targeting limitations. With a discussion on how emerging methods combat these concerns, we present an overview of potential therapies with special emphasis on nanoparticle-based applications.

KEYWORDS:

Urinary tract infections; antimicrobial-coated catheters; bacteriophage therapy; drug delivery; nanoparticles

PMID:
29251520
DOI:
10.1080/1061186X.2017.1419356
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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17.
Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2017 Dec;36(4):192-201. doi: 10.12788/j.sder.2017.046.

Opportunities for laser-assisted drug delivery in the treatment of cutaneous disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ewenande@mgh.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery (LADD) is increasingly finding its way into clinical practice as a new means to enhance topical drug uptake and improve treatment of cutaneous disorders. To date, LADD has been used for a wide range of conditions, including photodamaged skin, neoplastic lesions, scars, cutaneous infections, and vitiligo as well as for topical anesthetic and aesthetic procedures. Substantiated by randomized controlled clinical trials, strong evidence is available for LADD's usefulness for photodynamic therapy (PDT), for which improved efficacy using laser-assisted photosensitizer treatment is established for actinic keratosis compared with conventional PDT. Over time, the modality has undergone increasing refinement and offers the potential advantages of reduced treatment durations, shortened incubation times, and the replacement of cumbersome, patient-dependent treatment regimens with quick, in-office procedures. Notwithstanding, LADD is still a new enhancement technique, and risks of both local and systemic adverse events are insufficiently explored. With conscientious development, however, LADD promises to improve existing regimens and make new pharmacological treatments a reality for a wide range of cutaneous disorders.

KEYWORDS:

PMID:
29224037
DOI:
10.12788/j.sder.2017.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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18.
Nanomedicine (Lond). 2017 Aug;12(16):2007-2019. doi: 10.2217/nnm-2017-0100. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Cell membrane-derived nanoparticles: emerging clinical opportunities for targeted drug delivery.

Author information

1
College of Pharmacy, Washington State University, Spokane, WA 99210, USA.
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Washington State University, Spokane, WA 99210, USA.

Abstract

Biofunctionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) is an essential component in targeted drug delivery. However, current nanotechnology remains inadequate to imitate complex intercellular interactions existing in physiological conditions in human bodies. Emerging concepts have been explored to utilize human cells to generate cell membrane-formed NPs because cells retain inherent abilities to interact with human tissues compared with synthetic nanomaterials. Neutrophils, red blood cells (RBCs), platelets and monocytes have been employed to form therapeutic NPs to treat vascular disease and cancer, and these novel drug delivery platforms show the translation potential to improve patient quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the concept of cell membrane-formed NPs, the molecular mechanisms of their disease targeting and the potential of personalized nanomedicine.

KEYWORDS:

cell-derived nanovesicles; inflammation; nanotechnology

PMID:
28745122
PMCID:
PMC5551523
DOI:
10.2217/nnm-2017-0100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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19.
Ther Deliv. 2017 Jul;8(8):685-699. doi: 10.4155/tde-2017-0097.

Posterior drug delivery via periocular route: challenges and opportunities.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, Medical Biology Centre, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK.
2
Centre for Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Dentistry & Biomedical Sciences; Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK.

Abstract

Drug delivery to the posterior segment via the periocular route is a promising route for delivery of a range of formulations. In this review, we have highlighted the challenges and opportunities of posterior segment drug delivery via the periocular route. Consequently, we have discussed different types of periocular routes, physiological barriers that limit effective drug delivery, practical challenges regarding patient compliance and acceptability and recent advances in developing innovative strategies to enhance periocular drug delivery. We conclude with a perspective on how we envisage the importance of understanding complex barrier functions so as to continue to develop innovative drug-delivery systems.

KEYWORDS:

drug delivery; periocular; posterior segment

PMID:
28730942
DOI:
10.4155/tde-2017-0097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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20.
Ther Deliv. 2017 Jul;8(8):647-661. doi: 10.4155/tde-2017-0037.

Drug delivery to the lungs: challenges and opportunities.

Author information

1
Scientific Consultant, 6 Nelson Drive, Hunstanton, PE36 5DU, Norfolk, UK.

Abstract

Pulmonary drug delivery is relatively complex because the respiratory tract has evolved defense mechanisms to keep inhaled drug particles out of the lungs and to remove or inactivate them once deposited. In addition to these mechanical, chemical and immunological barriers, pulmonary drug delivery is adversely affected by the behavioral barriers of poor adherence and poor inhaler technique. Strategies to mitigate the effects of these barriers include use of inhaler devices and formulations that deliver drug to the lungs efficiently, appropriate inhaler technique and improved education of patients. Owing to the advantages offered by the pulmonary route, the challenges that the route poses are worth addressing, and if successfully addressed, the pulmonary route offers huge opportunities, often fulfilling unmet clinical needs.

KEYWORDS:

COPD; asthma; cystic fibrosis; inhaled insulin; inhaler devices; lung defense mechanisms; true adherence

PMID:
28730933
DOI:
10.4155/tde-2017-0037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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