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1.
Gene Ther. 1999 Feb;6(2):245-52.

The glucocorticoid receptor gene as a candidate for gene therapy in asthma.

Author information

1
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U454, CHU de Montpellier, France.

Abstract

Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used as anti-inflammatory drugs in asthma, but can produce serious secondary effects and, moreover, be inefficient in corticoresistant asthmatics. After binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), they repress the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines via inhibition of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappa B. Since qualitative and quantitative defects of the GR have been reported in corticoresistant patients, the transfer of the GR gene in the lung epithelium, the primary site of inflammation in asthma, may restore sensitivity to GC in these patients. As a prerequisite to in vivo studies, we have transfected A549 human lung epithelial cells with a GR expression vector. Using AP-1 and NF-kappa B-dependent reporter gene assays and an immunoassay for the pro-inflammatory cytokine RANTES, we show that the over-expressed GR significantly repressed AP-1 and NF-kappa B activities in the absence of hormone and that the GC dexamethasone produced an additive inhibitory effect. The GC-independent repression of AP-1 and NF-kappa B activities was further demonstrated by overexpressing a ligand-binding deficient GR mutant. Our data suggest that delivery of the GR gene in vivo may reduce inflammation without recourse to GC and may constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for corticoresistant asthma.

PMID:
10435109
DOI:
10.1038/sj.gt.3300814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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2.
Gene Ther. 1997 Jun;4(6):507-16.

Gene therapy strategies for asthma.

Author information

1
INSERM U454, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France.

Abstract

Asthma is a disease which is increasing in frequency and severity despite the incontestable advances in the understanding of its physiology and treatment. New therapeutic strategies are therefore required and at the time when a new treatment, that of gene therapy, is giving hope for the treatment of so far incurable illnesses, it would seem to us to be useful to discuss the possible use of this treatment in severe asthma and in particular in the case of the most severe asthmatic patients requiring continuous oral steroid treatment (referred to as steroid-dependent). These patients are those who require particular medical attention, they often need to be admitted to hospital and they represent over 50% of the total costs associated with asthma. No satisfactory alternative therapy is currently available. In this regard, a variety of gene-based strategies have recently been proposed for inflammatory and immunologic disorders. It is thus the purpose of this review to consider its application to asthma therapy, although there are very few published works that directly bear on gene therapy linked to asthma. After a brief outline of the epidemiology of asthma, its genetics and the available animal models, we will focus on its immunopathology slanting the discussion towards the possibility of a gene-based treatment.

PMID:
9231066
DOI:
10.1038/sj.gt.3300419
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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