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1.
Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle). 2015 Jun 1;4(6):346-357.

Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Topical Negative Pressure Device in Promoting Healing in Chronic Wounds.

Author information

1
Wound Healing Research Unit, School of Medicine, Cardiff University , Cardiff, United Kingdom .

Abstract

Aim: This observational study evaluated the use of a novel, ultraportable, mechanically powered topical negative pressure device in promoting healing in chronic wounds, including venous and mixed etiology leg ulcers and neuropathic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: Evaluable patients (n=37) received treatment with the SNaP® Wound Care System for up to 6 weeks. The primary objective was percentage change in wound size, with secondary objectives of clinical assessment of wound parameters, ease of use, and impact on quality of life. Results: A 42.64% mean percentage decrease in wound area was observed, with an overall decrease for each wound etiology subgroup. Increased granulation tissue, decreased exudate levels, and decreased wound pain were reported. Quality-of-life scores increased overall, and the device was easy to use, comfortable, portable, and inconspicuous. Conclusion: The SNaP Wound Care System has the potential to promote healing in chronic wounds of different etiologies.

3.
Br J Dermatol. 2003 Mar;148(3):456-66.

Anaerobic cocci populating the deep tissues of chronic wounds impair cellular wound healing responses in vitro.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, CF14 4XY, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anaerobic cocci are estimated to be present in the deep tissues of over 50% of chronic skin wounds. While the part they play in the chronicity of these wounds is uninvestigated, anaerobic cocci have previously been shown to be involved in other chronic inflammatory human conditions.

METHODS:

In this study the anaerobic microflora of the deep tissues of 18 patients with refractory chronic venous leg ulcers (mean age 80.3 years; mean duration > 24 months) was characterized using strict anaerobic culture conditions. The effect of the anaerobic organisms isolated from these tissues on extracellular matrix (ECM) proteolysis and cellular wound healing responses was studied using in vitro models.

RESULTS:

Anaerobic organisms were present in the deep tissues of 14 of 18 wounds and were principally Peptostreptococcus spp. The effects of three Peptostreptococcus spp. isolated from these wounds (P. magnus, P. vaginalis and P. asaccharolyticus) on cellular wound healing responses were compared with those of two pathogenic organisms also isolated from these wounds (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Citrobacter diversus). While the direct ECM proteolytic activity exhibited by the Peptostreptococcus spp. was limited, they did significantly inhibit both fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, but only at high concentrations. However, at lower concentrations peptostreptococcal supernatants profoundly inhibited keratinocyte wound repopulation and endothelial tubule formation. The magnitude of these effects varied between strains and they were distinct from those demonstrated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Citrobacter diversus.

CONCLUSIONS:

These studies confirm the importance of anaerobic organisms in chronic wounds and demonstrate an indirect, strain-specific mechanism by which these microorganisms may play a part in mediating the chronicity of these wounds.

PMID:
12653737
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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4.
BMJ. 2002 Jan 19;324(7330):160-3.

Science, medicine and the future: healing chronic wounds.

Author information

1
Wound Healing Research Unit, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4UJ, UK. HardingKG@cf.ac.uk

Abstract

Greater interest in wound healing is needed to ensure higher standards of basic care. Precise identification of the systemic, local, and molecular factors underlying the wound healing problem in individual patients should allow better tailored treatment. Allogeneic skin grafting and bioengineered skin equivalents are being used successfully in patients with venous leg ulcers and diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

PMID:
11799036
PMCID:
PMC1122073
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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5.
Psychosom Med. 2001 Mar-Apr;63(2):216-20.

Psychological factors and delayed healing in chronic wounds.

Author information

1
Wound Healing Research Centre, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Studies have shown that stress can delay the healing of experimental punch biopsy wounds. This study examined the relationship between the healing of natural wounds and anxiety and depression.

METHODS:

Fifty-three subjects (31 women and 22 men) were studied. Wound healing was rated using a five-point Likert scale. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), a well-validated psychometric questionnaire. Psychological and clinical wound assessments were each conducted with raters and subjects blinded to the results of the other assessment.

RESULTS:

Delayed healing was associated with a higher mean HAD score (p = .0348). Higher HAD anxiety and depression scores (indicating "caseness") were also associated with delayed healing (p = .0476 and p = .0311, respectively). Patients scoring in the top 50% of total HAD scores were four times more likely to have delayed healing than those scoring in the bottom 50% (confidence interval = 1.06-15.08).

CONCLUSIONS:

The relationship between healing of chronic wounds and anxiety and depression as measured by the HAD was statistically significant. Further research in the form of a longitudinal study and/or an interventional study is proposed.

PMID:
11292268
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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