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1.
Nurs Educ Perspect. 2019 Sep/Oct;40(5):265-269. doi: 10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000557.

A Meeting of Hearts and Minds: A Critical Reflection on Building, Enhancing, and Sustaining Global Partnerships in Nursing Education.

Author information

1
About the Authors Sara Horton-Deutsch, PhD, RN, PMHCNS, ANEF, FAAN, is a professor, School of Nursing and Health Professions, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, California. Gisela Van Rensburg, D Litt et Phil, RN, FANSA, is a professor, Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa. The authors acknowledge the thoughtful feedback they received from participants at the Watson Caring Science Arts Health Humanity Conference, October 2019, and the ongoing inspiration they receive from their graduate students and national/international colleagues. For more information, contact Dr. Horton-Deutsch at shortondeutsch@usfca.edu.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of the study was to engage in a critical reflective dialogue through a purposeful and strategic process to build, enhance, and sustain global partnerships.

BACKGROUND:

Expanding global health through partnerships necessitates a critical dialogue on shared values and understandings. Appreciating philosophical orientations, ethical perspectives, and broadening what counts as evidence serves to further inform scholarship and practice partnerships.

METHOD:

We engaged in a critical reflective dialogue by exploring our experiences through a purposeful and strategic process where we described, examined, and articulated the learning that informs our partnership.

RESULTS:

By listening to each other's stories, reflecting individually, and dialoguing together, we have shared and compared experiences that gave us more insight into how to build, enhance, and sustain our partnership.

CONCLUSION:

Continuously examining issues and discussions around partnerships through a critical reflective process supports the development of shared values and meaning, strengthens connections, and leads to new knowledge for sustaining global health partnerships.

PMID:
31436688
DOI:
10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000557
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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2.
Educ Health (Abingdon). 2016 May-Aug;29(2):113-8. doi: 10.4103/1357-6283.188750.

A medical school's approach to meeting the challenges of interdisciplinary global health education for resident physicians.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Office of International Activities, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
2
Office of International Activities, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, USA.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine, Executive Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Following a similar trend among United States (US) medical students, US resident physicians are increasingly interested in pursuing global health education. Largely, residency education has lagged behind in addressing this demand. Time and curriculum requirements make meeting this need challenging. The Office of International Activities (OIA) at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) was founded to provide support to students and residents in the area global health. In order to more fully understand resident physicians' attitudes and educational needs, a survey of incoming residents was undertaken.

METHODS:

The OIA administered a survey for incoming first-year residents of all specialties in July 2012. The survey was administered over one month using Qualtrics® and the response rate was 60%.

RESULTS:

Although 42% of residents had had an international experience during medical school, only 36% reported they felt prepared to address issues of international public health, including travel medicine and immigrant health. Significant barriers to involvement in global health opportunities in residency education were identified, including lack of time, finances and mentorship.

DISCUSSION:

As has been previously documented for global health education for medical students, this study's residents saw significant barriers to international electives during residency, including lack of elective time, finances and family responsibilities. In response to the survey results, an interdisciplinary educational initiative was developed at our school. This included obtaining buy-in from core residency leadership, establishing a pathway to arrange experiences, competitive scholarships for travel, and initiation of interdisciplinary educational opportunities. Results may serve as a useful model for other academic centers in developed countries.

PMID:
27549648
DOI:
10.4103/1357-6283.188750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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3.
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2016 Jul;26(6):1186-8. doi: 10.1097/IGC.0000000000000735.

Sister Society Meeting on Global Education Development and Collaboration: Meeting Report.

Author information

1
*Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; †Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital; ‡Schuur Hospital/University of Cape Town; §University of Michigan; ∥University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; ¶University of Toronto Odette Cancer Centre; #Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic; **US Oncology Network; ††Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute, New Delhi, India; ‡‡CAREpath Canada/University of Toronto; §§University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul Korea; ∥∥Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital; ¶¶Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, UK; ##Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London; ***University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital; †††Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine; ‡‡‡Leiden University Medical Center Leiden The Netherlands; §§§University of the West Indies, Mona Campus; ∥∥∥Clinical Center of Serbia Belgrade Serbia; ¶¶¶Instituto de Cancerología las Américas, Colombia; ###International Gynecologic Cancer Society; ****Society of Gynecologic Oncology; ††††University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; ‡‡‡‡Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; §§§§National Cancer Institute; ∥∥∥∥ and the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To identify common barriers to teaching and training and to identify strategies that would be useful in developing future training programs in gynecologic oncology in low- and middle- income countries.

METHODS:

There is a lack of overall strategy to meet the needs of education and training in gynecologic oncology in low- and middle- income countries, the leaderships of sister societies and global health volunteers met at the European Society of Gynecologic Oncology in October 23, 2015. The challenges of the training programs supported by gynecologic oncology societies, major universities and individual efforts were presented and discussed. Strategies to improve education and training were identified.

RESULTS:

Major challenges include language barriers, limited surgical equipment, inadequate internet access, lack of local support for sustainability in training programs, inadequate pathology and radiation oncology, finance and a global deficiency in identifying sites and personnel in partnering or developing training programs. The leaderships identified various key components including consultation with the local Ministry of Health, local educational institutions; inclusion of the program into existing local programs, a needs assessment, and the development of curriculum and regional centers of excellence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Proper preparation of training sites and trainers, the development of global curriculum, the establishment of centers of excellence, and the ability to measure outcomes are important to improve education and training in gynecologic oncology in low- and middle- income countries.

PMID:
27327155
DOI:
10.1097/IGC.0000000000000735
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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4.
Semin Pediatr Surg. 2015 Jun;24(3):134-7. doi: 10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2015.02.012. Epub 2015 Mar 4.

The role of new information technology meeting the global need and gap of education in pediatric surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany. Electronic address: ure.benno@mh-hannover.de.
2
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

Traditionally, pediatric surgical education consisted of exposure to patients, textbooks, lectures, team-based education, congresses, and workshops. Over the last decades, however, new information technology (IT) and the internet revolutionized the sharing of information and communication. IT has become relevant in particular for the younger generation of pediatric surgeons. Today, gaps in children's health and the quality of pediatric surgical education persist between countries and regions. Advances in health care are not shared equitably. The use of IT for resource libraries, teleconferences, virtual symposiums, and telementoring has great potential in closing this gap and meeting the global needs for pediatric surgical education. This article focuses on the potential role of IT in this respect.

KEYWORDS:

Information technology; Teleconferencing; Teleconsultation; Telementoring

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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5.
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 Sep;33(9):1045-50. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.04.016. Epub 2012 May 29.

Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: part 3; "the pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK.

Author information

1
Division of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Health Studies, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford, BD7 1DP, UK. m.cooper2@bradford.ac.uk

Abstract

AIM:

to describe the conceptualisation and development of an inclusive educational model. The model is designed to facilitate pre-registration midwifery students' learning around the health and social care needs of pregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom.

BACKGROUND:

current literature has identified a concern about the standard of maternity care experienced by asylum seeking women accessing maternity services in the United Kingdom. In response to this, a doctorate study was undertaken which focused on examining the way in which a group of midwifery students approached the provision of care for asylum seekers. This study revealed difficulties that these students had both in identifying these women's needs and also in the wider care issues in practice. Consequently, one of the recommendations was to ameliorate these difficulties through midwifery education.

METHODS:

the key findings from this study were used together with relevant supporting literature to construct "the pregnant woman within the global context" model for midwifery education.

RESULTS:

The model is designed to facilitate a holistic assessment of need rather than focusing on the physical assessment at the expense of other aspects of care. It incorporates wider factors, on a global level, which could impact on the health and social care needs of a pregnant woman seeking asylum. It also prompts students to consider the influence of dominant discourses on perceptions of asylum seek;ing and is designed to encourage students' to question these discourses.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

this model can be used in midwifery education to prepare students in caring for pregnant women seeking asylum. It may be especially helpful when students have close contact with pregnant women seeking asylum, for example through caseloading. Further research is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of this model in enhancing the care of asylum seeking women in the United Kingdom.

KEYWORDS:

Cultural competence; Global perspective; Holistic midwifery care; Midwifery models; Pregnant asylum seeking women; Student caseloading

PMID:
22647390
DOI:
10.1016/j.nedt.2012.04.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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6.
Am Ann Deaf. 2007 Spring;152(1):5-19.

Meeting global deaf peers, visiting ideal deaf places: deaf ways of education leading to empowerment, an exploratory case study.

Author information

1
Gallaudet University, Washington, DC, USA. Goedele.DeClerck@UGent.bc

Abstract

In a flemish case study, deaf role models revealed a moment of awakening, indicated by the Flemish sign WAKE-UP Contact with deaf cultural rhetoric made them wake up, and deconstruct and reconstruct their lives, a process represented by a circle of deaf empowerment. Flemish deaf leaders mentioned acquiring this rhetoric during visits to deaf dream worlds (in Flemish Sign Language, WORLD DREAM): places with ideal conditions for deaf people. Such global deaf encounters (Breivik, Haualand, & Solvang, 2002) lead to the "insurrection of subjugated [deaf] knowledges" (Pease, 2002, p. 33). Whereas deaf education had never provided them with deaf cultural rhetoric and was depositing upon them oppressive societal conventions (Jankowski, 1997), a common sign language (Mottez, 1993) and global deaf experience (Breivik et al., 2002; Murray, in press) in barrier-free environments (Jankowski, 1997) provided deaf ways of deaf education (Erting, 1996; Reilly, 1995).

PMID:
17642360
DOI:
10.1353/aad.2007.0009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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