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Best matches for Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations:

Food Composition Tables of Japan and the Nutrient Table/Database. Watanabe T et al. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). (2015)

The State of America's Wasted Food and Opportunities to Make a Difference. Vogliano C et al. J Acad Nutr Diet. (2016)

Staple crops biofortified with increased vitamins and minerals: considerations for a public health strategy. Garcia-Casal MN et al. Ann N Y Acad Sci. (2017)

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1.
Avian Dis. 2010 Mar;54(1 Suppl):380-3.

Main achievements of the World Organisation for Animal Health/United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization network on animal influenza.

Author information

1
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Animal Health Service, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy. Gwenaelle.Dauphin@fao.org

Abstract

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)/United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) joint network of expertise on animal influenza (OFFLU) includes all ten OIE/FAO reference laboratories and collaborating centers for avian influenza, other diagnostic laboratories, research and academic institutions, and experts in the fields of virology, epidemiology, vaccinology, and molecular biology. OFFLU has made significant progress in improving its infrastructure, in identifying and addressing technical gaps, and in establishing associations among leading veterinary institutions. Interaction with the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Influenza Program is also critical, and mechanisms for permanent interaction are being developed. OFFLU played a key role in the WHO/OIE/FAO Joint Technical Consultation held in Verona (October 7-9, 2008), which provided an opportunity to highlight and share knowledge and identify potential gaps regarding issues at the human-animal interface for avian influenza. OFFLU experts also contributed to the working group for the Unified Nomenclature System for H5N1 influenza viruses based on hemagglutinin gene phylogeny (WHO/OIE/FAO, H5N1 Evolution Working Group, Towards a unified nomenclature system for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) in Emerging Infectious Diseases 14:el, 2008). OFFLU technical activities, led by expert scientists from OIE/FAO reference institutions and coordinated by OIE and FAO focal points, have been prioritized to include commercial diagnostic kit evaluation, applied epidemiology, biosafety, vaccination, proficiency testing, development of standardized reference materials for sera and RNA, and issues at the human-animal interface. The progress to date and future plans for these groups will be presented. OFFLU is also involved in two national projects implemented by FAO in Indonesia and Egypt that seek to establish sustainable mechanisms for monitoring virus circulation, including viral characterization, and for streamlining the process to update poultry vaccines for avian influenza.

PMID:
20521664
DOI:
10.1637/8761-033109-REV.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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2.
Dev Biol (Basel). 2007;128:73-8.

The new policy of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and its Reference Centres for the Animal Production and Health Division.

Author information

1
Animal Health Service, Animal Production and Health Division, Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome, Italy. juan.lubroth@fao.org

Abstract

The article explains the current procedures to be followed for institutes that are, were or would like to become Reference Centres for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. Within the realm of animal health many of the Reference Laboratories and Reference Centres of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) are the same as those of the Animal and Health Division of FAO, particularly for diseases that are transboundary in nature, but they also address other aspects concerning health, production, standard setting, agriculture, conservation, water, and biotechnology.

PMID:
18084931
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
3.
AAPS J. 2005 Sep 22;7(2):E274-80.

The joint food and agriculture organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and its role in the evaluation of the safety of veterinary drug residues in foods.

Author information

1
Centre for Veterinary Drug Residues, Canadian Food Inspection Agency--Saskatoon Laboratory, 116 Veterinary Road, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 2R3. jmacneil@inspection.gc.ca

Abstract

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended the evaluation of food additives at the international level through the establishment of an expert committee or committees. These committees evaluated the safety of food additives present as residues resulting from the use of pesticides or veterinary pharmaceuticals. The results of these meetings include international harmonization on acceptable daily intake of these compounds and the maximum residue limit that is permitted to be present within any food of animal or plant origin. The decisions rendered by these committees provide a key element in the elimination of international trade barriers associated with products intended for human consumption.

PMID:
16353909
PMCID:
PMC2750965
DOI:
10.1208/aapsj070228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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4.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Jan;59(1 Suppl):269S-270S. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/59.1.269S.

Dietary assessment issues of concern to policymakers: statement from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Author information

1
Food Policy and Nutrition Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Since its establishment in 1945, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has worked with member countries to increase food production and food supplies and improve the nutritional well-being of the world population. Dietary assessment is an important component in the process of identifying groups that are nutritionally at risk and in developing appropriate programs and policies to improve nutritional well-being. However, simpler, more cost-effective methods are needed that will allow rapid analysis of survey results so that information can be readily available to policymakers at all levels. FAO continues to work toward development of methods to improve nutrition monitoring and surveillance for developed and developing countries.

PMID:
8279439
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/59.1.269S
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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17.
FAO Food Nutr Pap. 1982;24:1-194.

Evaluation of nutrition interventions. An annotated bibliography and review of methodologies and results. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Abstract

1. This is the second edition of an annotated bibliography covering evaluation methodology and evaluations of nutrition interventions. It contains more than 110 items on methodology and around 300 reports describing the results from evaluation studies. Included are most of the 250 items listed in the first edition, which was compiled in 1980, by G.P. Sevenhuysen and Ann Burgess. Almost all the items are available in the FAO libraries in Rome. 2. The most useful of the items are starred and also indexed in Tables 1, 2 or 3. Evaluation methodology 3. There was general agreement in the guidelines on evaluation methodology on the following points: Evaluation should be an integral routine programme activity wherever possible; Field staff must be involved at all stages of the evaluation including interpretation; Results should be rapidly 'fed-back' to allow adaptations to be made to the programme if necessary. 4. Many of the guidelines did not adequately cover the following points: How to conduct both 'operational' and 'impact' evaluation; The importance of taking into account, when designing the evaluation, the needs of the people who will use the results; How to select a representative sample; How to overcome the problem of 'drop-outs'; How to measure 'leakage' of programme inputs; How to control for non-programme variables; How to distinguish among the effects of multiple inputs; How to measure costs and cost-effectiveness; How to ensure data reliability. A review of reports of evaluation studies confirmed that better guidelines are needed in these areas. Evaluation reports 5. In only about one third of the studies examined were sufficient details available for a good assessment to be made of the reliability of the results. 6. Among the problems that made it difficult to assess the value of some of the results were: A lack of specific programme objectives and of baseline data; Inadequate statistical testing of the results; Conclusions based mainly on subjective opinion rather than objective information; A weak data base, due to an unrepresentative sample, a high 'drop-out' rate among the selected sample, or insufficient data collected; A lack of information on the 'dosage' of the input actually reaching the recipients; A lack of information on possible differences in age distribution, and other variables, in the test and control groups; No control of non-programme variables; An evaluation design that did not allow the different contributions of multiple programme inputs to be assessed; No data on costs; Lack of information on which to judge data reliability.

PMID:
6086144
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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