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1.
J Autism Dev Disord. 2015 May;45(5):1437-50. doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2306-4.

Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Criteria.

Author information

1
Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA, Elizabeth.harstad@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Controversy exists regarding the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and DSM-IV-TR sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70). DSM-5 was psychometrically superior to the DSM-IV-TR model (Comparative Fit Index of 0.970 vs 0.879, respectively). Measurement invariance revealed good model fit across gender and IQ. Younger children tended to meet fewer diagnostic criteria. Those with autistic disorder were more likely to meet social communication and repetitive behaviors criteria (p < .001) than those with PDD-NOS. DSM-5 is a robust model but will identify a different, albeit overlapping population of individuals compared to DSM-IV-TR.

PMID:
25384720
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-014-2306-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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2.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;51(6):605-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2012.03.010.

Variability among research diagnostic interview instruments in the application of DSM-IV-TR criteria for pediatric bipolar disorder.

Author information

1
State University of New York Downstate and the Kings County Hospital Center, 451 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. cathryn.galanter@downstate.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The DSM-IV-TR criteria for a manic episode and bipolar disorder (BD) were developed for adults but are used for children. The manner in which clinicians and researchers interpret these criteria may have contributed to the increase in BD diagnoses given to youth. Research interviews are designed to improve diagnostic reliability and validity, but vary in how they incorporate DSM-IV-TR criteria for pediatric BD.

METHOD:

We examined DSM-IV-TR criteria and the descriptive text for a manic episode and the mania sections of six commonly used pediatric diagnostic research interviews focusing on the following: interpretation of DSM-IV-TR, recommendations for administration, and scoring methods.

RESULTS:

There are differences between the DSM-IV-TR manic episode criteria and descriptive text. Instruments vary in several ways including in their conceptualization of the mood criterion, whether symptoms must represent a change from the child's usual state, and whether B-criteria are required to co-occur with the A-criterion. Instruments also differ on recommendations for administration and scoring methods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Given the differences between DSM-IV-TR manic episode criteria and explanatory text, it is not surprising that there is considerable variation between diagnostic instruments based on DSM-IV-TR. These differences likely lead to dissimilarities in subjects included in BD research studies and inconsistent findings across studies. The field of child psychiatry would benefit from more uniform methods of assessing symptoms and determining pediatric BD diagnoses. We discuss recommendations for changes to future instruments, interviews, assessment, and the DSM-5.

PMID:
22632620
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaac.2012.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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3.
Biol Psychiatry. 2011 Mar 15;69(6):592-600. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.10.023. Epub 2010 Dec 31.

Prevalence and perceived health associated with insomnia based on DSM-IV-TR; International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision; and Research Diagnostic Criteria/International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition criteria: results from the America Insomnia Survey.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders and Research Center, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although several diagnostic systems define insomnia, little is known about the implications of using one versus another of them.

METHODS:

The America Insomnia Survey, an epidemiological survey of managed health care plan subscribers (n = 10,094), assessed insomnia with the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire, a clinically validated scale generating diagnoses according to DSM-IV-TR; International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10); and Research Diagnostic Criteria/International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition (RDC/ICSD-2) criteria. Regression analysis examines associations of insomnia according to the different systems with summary 12-item Short-Form Health Survey scales of perceived health and health utility.

RESULTS:

Insomnia prevalence estimates varied widely, from 22.1% for DSM-IV-TR to 3.9% for ICD-10 criteria. Although ICD insomnia was associated with significantly worse perceived health than DSM or RDC/ICSD insomnia, DSM-only cases also had significant decrements in perceived health. Because of its low prevalence, 66% of the population-level health disutility associated with overall insomnia and 84% of clinically relevant cases of overall insomnia were missed by ICD criteria.

CONCLUSIONS:

Insomnia is highly prevalent and associated with substantial decrements in perceived health. Although ICD criteria define a narrower and more severe subset of cases than DSM criteria, the fact that most health disutility associated with insomnia is missed by ICD criteria, while RDC/ICSD-only cases do not have significant decrements in perceived health, supports use of the broader DSM criteria.

PMID:
21195389
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.10.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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4.
J Pers Disord. 2006 Apr;20(2):170-80; discussion 181-5.

Normative warrant in diagnostic criteria: the case of DSM-IV-TR personality disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX 75390-9070, USA. John.Sadler@UTSouthwestern.edu

Abstract

This article focuses on the kinds of evaluative judgments made when applying DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria within the diagnostic interview between clinician and patient. The authors name these kinds of value judgments in diagnosis "normative warrant" because they involve one or more justifications (warrants) for standard-bearing (normative) elements involved in applying diagnostic criteria to actual patients. Seven types of normative warrant judgments are described (Type 1, Semantic-Phenomenal Matching; Type 2, Solicitation Choice; Type 3, Sociocultural Context; Type 4, Performance-Context Matching; Type 5, Deviance Threshold; Type 6, Threshold Characterization; Type 7, Disvalue characterization) and the typology is illustrated by applying it to various DSM-IV-TR personality disorder criteria. A research and clinical understanding of normative warrant may well contribute to the refinement of criteria sets as well as the refinement of the clinical use of criteria sets.

PMID:
16643120
DOI:
10.1521/pedi.2006.20.2.170
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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