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1.
Bioeng Transl Med. 2019 Sep 5;4(3):e10143. doi: 10.1002/btm2.10143. eCollection 2019 Sep.

Nanoparticles in the clinic: An update.

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1
Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill North Carolina.
2
John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Harvard University, Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering Cambridge Massachusetts.

Abstract

Nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been used in the clinic since the early 1990's. Since that time, the field of nanomedicine has evolved alongside growing technological needs to improve the delivery of various therapeutics. Over these past decades, newer generations of nanoparticles have emerged that are capable of performing additional delivery functions that can enable treatment via new therapeutic modalities. In the current clinical landscape, many of these new generation nanoparticles have reached clinical trials and have been approved for various indications. In the first issue of Bioengineering & Translational Medicine in 2016, we reviewed the history, current clinical landscape, and clinical challenges of nanoparticle delivery systems. Here, we provide a 3 year update on the current clinical landscape of nanoparticle drug delivery systems and highlight newly approved nanomedicines, provide a status update on previous clinical trials, and highlight new technologies that have recently entered the clinic.

KEYWORDS:

clinic; clinical translation; clinical trials; drug delivery; nanomedicine; nanoparticles; translational medicine

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2.
Bioeng Transl Med. 2016 Jun 3;1(1):10-29. doi: 10.1002/btm2.10003. eCollection 2016 Mar.

Nanoparticles in the clinic.

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1
David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139.
2
Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Center for Bioengineering University of California Santa Barbara CA 93106.

Abstract

Nanoparticle/microparticle-based drug delivery systems for systemic (i.e., intravenous) applications have significant advantages over their nonformulated and free drug counterparts. For example, nanoparticle systems are capable of delivering therapeutics and treating areas of the body that other delivery systems cannot reach. As such, nanoparticle drug delivery and imaging systems are one of the most investigated systems in preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we will highlight the diversity of nanoparticle types, the key advantages these systems have over their free drug counterparts, and discuss their overall potential in influencing clinical care. In particular, we will focus on current clinical trials for nanoparticle formulations that have yet to be clinically approved. Additional emphasis will be on clinically approved nanoparticle systems, both for their currently approved indications and their use in active clinical trials. Finally, we will discuss many of the often overlooked biological, technological, and study design challenges that impact the clinical success of nanoparticle delivery systems.

KEYWORDS:

clinic; clinical translation; clinical trials; drug delivery; nanomedicine; nanoparticles; translational medicine

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